• In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus seems to operate like a heat-driven missile of disease. Scientists say the hotter it gets, the better the mosquito that carries Zika virus is at transmitting a variety of dangerous illnesses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Health officials want more Zika samples, data from Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil is not sharing enough samples and disease data to let researchers determine whether the Zika virus is, as feared, linked to the increased number of babies born with abnormally small heads in the South American country, U.N. and U.S. health officials say.

  • Brazil's Health Minister Marcelo Castro speaks to the press before attending the Mercosur Health Ministers summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate actions to try and fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. Castro said that efforts are being made to create a vaccine against it. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    APNewsbreak: Few Zika samples being shared by Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — U.N. and U.S. health officials tell The Associated Press that Brazil has yet to share enough samples and disease data needed to answer the most worrying question about the Zika outbreak: whether the virus is actually responsible for the increase in the number of babies born with abnormally small heads in Brazil.

  • This Aug. 8, 2008 file photo, shows embryos being placed onto a CryoLeaf ready for instant freezing using the vitrification process. In a statement Monday Feb. 1, 2016, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority, Britain’s fertility regulator, has approved a scientist’s application to edit the human genetic code using a new technique that some fear crosses too many ethical boundaries. (Ben Birchall/PA via AP, File) UNITED KINGDOM OUT

    Britain approves controversial gene-editing technique

    LONDON (AP) — In a landmark decision that some ethicists warned is a step down the path toward “designer babies,” Britain gave scientists approval Monday to conduct experiments in which they will try to edit the genes in human embryos.