• In this Thursday, July 28, 2016, file photo, fans play the highly addictive "Pokemon Go" game during a gathering in central Madrid, Spain, to play the computer game. Since debuting to wild adulation in the U.S., Australia and New Zealand this month, the game from Google spinoff Niantic Inc. has spread like wildfire, launching in more than 30 countries or territories, but not Brazil. For athletes and other visitors caught up in the wave, not having access is just one more knock against an Olympics that officials are racing to get ready. The opening ceremony takes place Friday, Aug. 5. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza, File)

    What’s troubling athletes arriving in Rio? No ‘Pokemon Go’

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — So the plumbing and electricity in the athletes’ village took several days to fix. Who cares?

    Updated: 11:30 am

  • No criminal violations found during 38 Studios investigation

    SCITUATE, R.I. (AP) — An investigation into former Red Sox pitcher Curt Schilling’s failed video game company, 38 Studios, has resulted in no criminal violations, authorities announced Friday.

  • This image released by Lionsgate shows Emma Roberts in a scene from the thriller, "Nerve." Nerve is an app-based game that’s all the rage among the kids. You can choose to be a “player” or a “watcher.” Players are given dares by anonymous masses of watchers with the promise of cash prizes at the end of each dare, which they have to film themselves doing. (Niko Tavernise/Lionsgate via AP)

    ‘Nerve’ is a dark thriller for the Pokémon Go generation

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The invigorating new thriller “Nerve ,” now playing in theaters, goes deep into the psychology of the internet with an addictive game that’s so fresh, you wonder whether the filmmakers had a tip that the Pokemon Go craze was on the horizon.

  • In this May 26, 2016, file photo, Tennessee Titans coach Mike Mularkey watches as players stretch during NFL football practice in Nashville, Tenn. Titans controlling owner Amy Adams Strunk saw enough of Mularkey as he finished the final nine games last season as interim coach to give him the job after interviewing a handful of coaches in January. Her decision made Mularkey the 16th man hired as a permanent coach of three or more NFL teams since the NFL-AFL merger in 1970. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey, File)

    Mularkey believes Titans right fit for 3rd time as NFL coach

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Coach Mike Mularkey warned the Tennessee Titans’ 10 draft picks.

  • Darlington: Ready, Set, Pokemon Go.

    DARLINGTON, S.C. (AP) — Sprint Cup cars aren’t the only things that will go at Darlington Raceway this summer.

  • This Oct. 18, 2014 photo shows fan art from the anime series "Tamako Market" at the Demachi Masugata Shotengai in Kyoto, Japan. Anime tourism is a phenomenon in Japan, with fans hunting down real-world places that are used as settings in the cartoons. (Michael Vito via AP)

    Fans hunt real places in Japan featured in anime

    TOKYO (AP) — Everyone’s surprised that “Pokemon Go” is getting people out from behind their screens and out of the house. But Japanese animated creations have a much longer tradition of sending people on real-world adventures, although in a very different way.

  • In this Monday, July 18, 2016, photo, a "Pokemon Go" player shows his mobile phone while walking through the Boston Common, outside the Massachusetts Statehouse in Boston. Historical markers dot the landscape of old cities, barely noticed by passers-by. The founder of the volunteer-based historical markers website that licensed its data to game-maker Niantic Labs five years ago said he hopes enough people take their eyes off the Pokemon they’re trying to catch to read the history on the markers. On the opposite side of the wall, left, is a bronze memorial to Robert Gould Shaw and the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, comprised of black Union soldiers who fought in the Civil War. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    ‘Pokemon Go’ players stumble on hidden history

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Historical markers have long dotted the landscape, often barely noticed by passers-by — until they became treasure-filled stops this month on the “Pokemon Go” trail.

  • People mourn beside the Olympia shopping center where a shooting took place leaving nine people dead two days ago in Munich, Germany, Sunday, July 24, 2016. (AP Photo/Jens Meyer)

    Munich shooter was bullied loner, planned attack for a year

    MUNICH (AP) — The teenager behind the deadly shooting rampage in Munich was a withdrawn loner obsessed with playing “killer” video games in his bedroom, a victim of bullying who suffered from panic attacks set off by contacts with other people, investigators said Sunday, adding that he had planned the attack for a year.

  • In this July 13, 2016 frame grab from video, Jordan Clark, left, and Lewis Gutierrez sit in Prospect Park as they talk about their new "Pokemon Go" business in the Brooklyn borough of New York. They are among the new entrepreneurs who offer their services as "trainers" for the game at $20 per hour - logging onto a client's "Pokemon Go" account and effectively running up their score while a client is stuck at work or sitting in class. (AP Photo/Ezra Kaplan)

    Too busy for Pokemon? These entrepreneurs will play for you

    NEW YORK (AP) — Too busy with your real life to play the hit augmented reality game “Pokemon Go”? For a price, some entrepreneurs will play the game for you.