• A home in floodwaters on Sullivan's Island, S.C., Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. The Charleston and surrounding areas are still struggling with floodwaters due to a slow moving storm system. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

    South Carolina flood: Door-to-door searches, swamped roads

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — People across South Carolina got an object lesson Monday in how you can dodge a hurricane and still get hammered.

    Updated: 4:34 pm

  • This undated photo provided by Cindy Anderson shows her son, Sean O'Connor. The 31-year-old was found dead in a home in suburban Cleveland in early May 2015 with heroin and the painkiller fentanyl in his system. Ohio health authorities are blaming a spike in fentanyl-laced heroin for another record year of overdose deaths in 2014. (Cindy Anderson via AP)

    Ohio mom says son knew risks of painkiller-laced heroin

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio mother whose adult son died of a drug overdose this year said her son knew the risks posed by painkiller-laced heroin flooding the state.

  • A man carrying his bicycle tries to make his way after floods in Biot, near Cannes, southeastern France, Sunday Oct.4, 2015. Sudden heavy rains around the French Riviera have killed at least 10 people, including some trapped in cars, a campsite and a retirement home, and left six missing. Car and train traffic was disrupted along the Mediterranean coast. (AP Photo/Lionel Cironneau)

    Flash floods on French Riviera kill at least 13

    ANTIBES, France (AP) — In a matter of minutes, torrential rains transformed the postcard-perfect French Riviera into a terrifying flood zone, leaving at least 16 dead, trapping hundreds of ailing pilgrims and halting car and train traffic Sunday along the mud-drenched Mediterranean coast.

  • A man paddles a kayak down a flooded street in Columbia, S.C., Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015. The rainstorm drenching the U.S. East Coast brought more misery Sunday to South Carolina, cutting power to thousands, forcing hundreds of water rescues and closing many roads because of floodwaters. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

    Gusty wind may add to weather risks on soggy East Coast

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Hundreds were rescued from fast-moving floodwaters Sunday in South Carolina as days of driving rain hit a dangerous crescendo that buckled buildings and roads, closed a major East Coast interstate route and threatened the drinking water supply for the capital city.

  • Brothers Logan Froehler, 17, at left, and Lukas, 11, throw a football while kayaking in their backyard on the Isle of Palms, S.C. on Saturday, Oct. 3, 2015. The National Weather Service says the risk of flooding will continue through Monday morning, especially in parts of North and South Carolina that already have gotten up to 11 inches of rain this week. Forecasters say some areas could see storm totals as high as 15 inches. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)

    More rain, flooding forecast along soggy East Coast

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — While spared the full fury of Hurricane Joaquin, parts of the East Coast saw record-setting rain Saturday that shut down roads, waterlogged crops and showed little sign of letting up.

  • Skies begin to darken as Hurricane Joaquin passes through the region, seen from Nassau, Bahamas, early Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. Hurricane Joaquin dumped torrential rains across the eastern and central Bahamas on Friday as a Category 4 storm. (AP Photo/Tim Aylen)

    Fate of cargo ship caught in Hurricane Joaquin unknown

    NASSAU, Bahamas (AP) — An intensive, dawn-to-dark search Saturday turned up a life ring but no other sign of a cargo ship with 33 people on board that lost power and communications off the southeastern Bahamas during Hurricane Joaquin.

  • Friday, October 2, 2015

    The Latest: Father of teen who survived Oregon shooting recounts her harrowing experience

  • Cars head toward the railroad underpass in Spartanburg, S.C., where 56-year-old Sylvia Arteaga was killed on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015, when flood waters inundated her car as she was driving home from work. The underpass is not wide enough to accommodate two cars, so motorists must alternate going under it. (AP Photo/Skip Foreman)

    East Coast braces for more heavy rain, approaching hurricane

    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — Millions along the East Coast breathed a little easier Friday after forecasters said Hurricane Joaquin would probably veer out to sea instead of joining up with a drenching rainstorm that is bringing severe flooding to parts of the Atlantic Seaboard.

  • This satellite image taken Friday, Oct. 2, 2015 at 8:45 a.m. EDT, and released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Hurricane Joaquin of the Bahamas. The Category 4 storm ripped off roofs, uprooted trees and unleashed heavy flooding as it hurled torrents of rain across the eastern and central Bahamas on Friday, and the U.S. Coast Guard said it was searching for a cargo ship with 33 people aboard that went missing during the storm.  (NOAA via AP)

    Joaquin lashes Bahamas; Powerful hurricane could threaten US

    ELEUTHERA, Bahamas (AP) — Hurricane Joaquin destroyed houses, uprooted trees and unleashed heavy flooding as it hurled torrents of rain across the Bahamas on Friday, and the U.S. Coast Guard said it was trying to reach a disabled cargo ship with 33 people aboard that lost contact during the storm.

  • Emergency personnel, including South Carolina Highway Patrol and the Spartanburg County Coroner's Office, work on the scene where several cars were trapped briefly under a bridge during flooding from heavy rain Thursday morning, Oct. 1, 2015, in Spartanburg, S.C. Spartanburg County Coroner Rusty Clevenger told local media that a person died early Thursday when several cars were submerged in flash floods under the bridge, where flooding often occurs during heavy rain. (AP Photo/Spartanburg Herald-Journal/Tim Kimzey) MANDATORY CREDIT

    1 dies in flooding as storms threaten to move up East Coast

    SPARTANBURG, S.C. (AP) — Drenching rains along an already-saturated East Coast caused major flooding Thursday, drowning a woman whose car quickly filled up with water and prompting flash-flood warnings from historic Charleston to Washington, D.C.