• HOLD FOR STORY BY DAVID EGGERT- FILE- In a file photo from Feb. 5, 2016, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, center and Our Lady of Guadalupe Church Deacon Omar Odette, right, meet with volunteers helping to load vehicles with bottled water in Flint, Mich. Snyder's standing as one of the GOP's most accomplished governors has taken a beating in the lead-contaminated water emergency in Flint. Democrats, especially those running for president, are pointing to mistakes by Snyder's administration during the crisis as a vivid example of Republican-style cost-cutting run amok. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Flint crisis may help governor ease GOP doubt on Detroit aid

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Rick Snyder’s standing as one of the GOP’s most accomplished governors has taken a beating in the crisis over lead-contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. Democrats, especially those running for president, have pointed to his administration’s mishandling of the city’s switch to a cheaper water supply as an example of Republican cost-cutting run amok.

  • In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 image from video, Luke Waid discusses the lead-contamination in Flint’s water as he watches his 2-year-old daughter, Sophia, and infant son, Luke Jr, in their Flint, Mich., home. A federal lawsuit filed Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, seeks unspecified damages from Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, the state of Michigan and city of Flint claiming Sophia has been sickened by the city’s water. (AP Photo/Mike Householder)

    Lead contamination of Flint water draws multiple lawsuits

    DETROIT (AP) — One lawsuit seeks to replace lead-leaching water lines at no cost to customers. Another seeks money for thousands of Flint residents who unwittingly drank toxic water. A third complaint has been filed on behalf of people with Legionnaires’ disease.

  • Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton meets members of the House Of Prayer Missionary Baptist Church, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, in Flint, Mich. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Clinton calls Flint water crisis ‘immoral’ in break from NH

    FLINT, Mich. (AP) — Taking a detour from New Hampshire’s campaign trail, Hillary Clinton said Sunday that a water crisis in a Michigan city was “immoral” and demanded that Congress approve $200 million in emergency aid to address the community’s battle with lead-contaminated water.