• In this Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, photo provided by the New York Stock Exchange, retired NBA star Kobe Bryant visits the exchange, in New York. Bryant has partnered with Jeff Stibel, an entrepreneur and investor, to form the $100 million venture-capital firm Bryant Stibel, based in Los Angeles. (New York Stock Exchange via AP)

    Kobe Bryant starts $100 million investment fund

    NEW YORK (AP) — Retired NBA star Kobe Bryant is moving to Wall Street, announcing the formation of a $100 million venture capital fund to invest in media, technology and data companies.

  • Executive dropping off UVA student dies in car crash

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A top executive with a California investment-management firm who was in Virginia to drop a student off at college has died after being struck by a car near campus.

  • Morgan Stanley accused of mismanaging its 401(k) plan

    NEW YORK (AP) — Even Wall Street workers are unhappy with how their retirement plans are run.

  • In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, file photo, the American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. U.S. stocks slipped early Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016, as investors continued to sell phone company and utility stocks. Materials companies are the exception, as they’re trading higher as the dollar weakens. Investors are also sifting through reports that showed inflation remained weak in July, but home building and factory production improved. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    US stocks earnings hit retailers like Target and Lowe’s

    BEIJING (AP) — Asian stocks rose Wednesday after Wall Street edged higher on news the U.S. Federal Reserve is in no hurry to raise interest rates. Japan’s benchmark fell after the country reported declines in both exports and imports in July.

  • Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks over the crowd during his campaign rally Tuesday, Aug. 16, 2016 in West Bend, Wis. (John Ehlke/West Bend Daily News via AP)

    How the Trump and Clinton tax plans would affect Americans

    WASHINGTON (AP) — For America’s wealthiest families, the presidential campaign presents a stark choice: A big tax increase if Hillary Clinton wins the election — or a big tax cut if Donald Trump wins.