• Microsoft co-founder and Berkshire board member Bill Gates, left, and Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett, center, appear during an interview with Liz Claman on the Fox Business Network in Omaha, Neb., Monday, May 2, 2016. The annual Berkshire Hathaway shareholders meeting took place over the weekend in Omaha with more than 40,000 in attendance. (AP Photo/John Peterson)

    Buffett praises Fed but warns of unintended consequences

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Investor Warren Buffett said the Federal Reserve and other policymakers are generally doing a good job, but it’s difficult to predict all the effects of interest rates remaining low for this long.

  • In this Wednesday, July 29, file 2015 photo, the Puerto Rican flag flies in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol as in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla said on Sunday, May 1, 2016, that negotiators for the U.S. territory’s government have failed to reach a last-minute deal to avoid a third default and that he has issued an executive order to withhold payment. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File)

    Q&A: Puerto Rico’s debt crisis explained

    NEW YORK (AP) — Puerto Rico’s debt crisis has reached a new level, with the island’s governor saying Puerto Rico will not pay most of its $470 million in debt payments due by Monday.

  • In this Wednesday, July 29, file 2015 photo, the Puerto Rican flag flies in front of Puerto Rico’s Capitol as in San Juan, Puerto Rico. Puerto Rico Gov. Alejandro Javier Garcia Padilla said on Sunday, May 1, 2016, that negotiators for the U.S. territory’s government have failed to reach a last-minute deal to avoid a third default and that he has issued an executive order to withhold payment. (AP Photo/Ricardo Arduengo, File)

    Q&A: Puerto Rico’s debt crisis explained

    NEW YORK (AP) — Puerto Rico’s debt crisis reached a new level late Sunday, when the island’s governor said Puerto Rico would not pay most of its $470 million in debt payments that are due by Monday.

  • While leaving US rates unchanged, Fed keeps an eye overseas

    WASHINGTON (AP) — When the Federal Reserve chose Wednesday not to raise its key interest rate, it nevertheless made clear that its next move will be another increase. That stance puts it at odds with other major central banks, which are doing the reverse — seeking to ease credit to spur lending.

  • In this Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016, file photo, Federal Reserve Board Chair Janet Yellen prepares to testify on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Banking Committee hearing on: "The Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to the Congress." On Wednesday, April 27, 2016, the Federal Reserve releases its latest monetary policy statement after wrapping up a two-day meeting. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

    No Fed rate hike expected Wednesday, but what about in June?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — On this, pretty much every economist agrees: The Federal Reserve will keep interest rates unchanged when it ends its latest policy meeting Wednesday. What’s unclear is whether it will hint about the likelihood of a rate hike at its next meeting in June.

  • This April 29, 2014, file photo, shows an Exxon sign at an Exxon gas station in Carnegie, Pa. Low oil prices have helped cost Exxon its pristine "AAA" credit rating from Standard & Poor's, a label it held for over six decades, S&P announced Tuesday, April 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)

    Stung by low oil prices, Exxon loses ‘AAA’ rating from S&P

    NEW YORK (AP) — Low oil prices have helped cost Exxon its pristine “AAA” credit rating from Standard & Poor’s, a label it held for over six decades.