• Famous cue maker charged with helping smuggle elephant ivory

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A famous custom pool cue maker has been charged in California with helping to smuggle protected elephant ivory by using it on his cues.

  • Indian forest officials and wildlife conservationists try to catch a baby Rhino that strayed into an adjacent village following floods at the Kaziranga National Park, east of Gauhati, northeastern Assam state, India, Thursday, July 28, 2016. The Rhino calf was rescued and sent to a conservation center. Forest officials say they have rescued six rhino calves from being washed away by floodwaters that have swamped the national park. (AP Photo/Anupam Nath)

    6 baby rhinos saved from being washed away by India floods

    KAZIRANGA, India (AP) — Wildlife workers have rescued six rhino calves from being washed away by floodwaters that have swamped a national park in northeastern India.

  • This Oct. 1, 2014, file photo shows a black-footed ferret peeking out of a tube after being brought to a ranch near Williams, Ariz. The endangered weasel is returning to an area of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago. Biologists plan to release 35 black-footed ferrets Tuesday, July 26, 2016, near Meeteetse, Wyo. Scientists thought the black-footed ferret was extinct until a dog brought a dead one home near Meeteetse in 1981. (AP Photo/Felicia Fonseca, File)

    Black-footed ferrets return to where they held out in wild

    MEETEETSE, Wyo. (AP) — A nocturnal species of weasel with a robber-mask-like marking across its eyes has returned to the remote ranchlands of western Wyoming where the critter almost went extinct more than 30 years ago.

  • Resident Laurent Lacore, 48, returns to his home near Sand Canyon Road in Santa Clarita, Calif., Monday, July 25, 2016. The majority of some 20,000 people forced from their homes by a wildfire that exploded during the weekend were told they could return home Monday night, though an army of firefighters continued battling flames in the rugged hills and canyons northwest of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ringo H.W. Chiu)

    Homes on edge of the wilderness complicate wildfire efforts

    SANTA CLARITA, Calif. (AP) — When Pat Telleria saw the wind-driven flames sweeping across the grass foothills toward his dream home, he picked up the phone.

  • Think Trump and Clinton fall flat? Vote for Cat in the Hat

    SPRINGFIELD, Mass. (AP) — Voters who think presidential candidates Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton fall flat can now choose the Cat in the Hat.

  • Sunland Park, Santa Teresa residents urged to conserve water

    SUNLAND PARK, N.M. (AP) — Officials in Dona Ana County are urging residents and businesses in the border communities of Sunland Park and Santa Teresa to conserve water.

  • In this July 18, 2016 photo, Sri Lankan mangrove conservation workers carry mangrove saplings for planting in Kalpitiya, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) north of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests _ the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, better absorb carbon from the environment mitigating effects of global warming and reducing impact of natural disasters like tsunamis. Authorities have identified about 37,000 acres (15,000 hectares) of mangrove forests in Sri Lanka that are earmarked for preservation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    Sri Lanka to conserve climate-friendly mangroves ecosystem

    PAMBALA LAGOON, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests — the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, absorb carbon from the environment and reduce the impact of natural disasters like tsunamis.

  • Crouch Mesa want water cutbacks to end boil advisory

    FARMINGTON, N.M. (AP) — Residents in northwestern New Mexico are pushing for water conservation to help end an ongoing boil advisory.

  • In this 2014 photo made available by the First Colony Foundation, archeologists excavate an area in rural Bertie County, N.C. Clues to what became of North Carolina’s fabled Lost Colony could lie in a waterfront tract where developers once wanted to build thousands of condos. Now, one of those would-be developers is seeking millions of dollars to preserve the property. (First Colony Foundation via AP)

    Site with clues to fate of fabled Lost Colony may be saved

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Clues to what became of North Carolina’s fabled Lost Colony could lie in a waterfront tract where developers once wanted to build thousands of condos — and now, one of those would-be developers is seeking millions of dollars to preserve the property.