• In this Wednesday, April 6, 2016, file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, in Bethpage, N.Y. Trump says he would create coal-mining jobs as president, and he criticizes Hillary Clinton for saying “we’re going to put a lot of coal miners” out of work. Trump, however, has yet to explain exactly how he will revitalize Appalachia’s coal industry. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)

    AP FACT CHECK: Bringing coal jobs back to Appalachia

    DALLAS (AP) — Donald Trump says he would bring back lost coal-mining jobs, and he is positioning for the November election in big coal states by portraying Hillary Clinton as a job killer.

    Updated: 4:30 am

  • In this March 23, 2016, file photo, Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull speaks at a press conference in Sydney. Australia's election campaign will officially start soon with climate change policy and union corruption in the national building industry shaping into key battlegrounds for the July 2 poll. Turnbull said Wednesday, May 4, 2016, that he was likely to visit Governor-General Peter Cosgrove this weekend to lock down the date and officially start the election campaign. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft, File)

    Prime minister says Australia to have July 2 election

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s election campaign will officially start soon with climate change policy and union corruption in the national building industry shaping into key battlegrounds for the July 2 poll.

  • In this Tuesday, April 12, 2016 photo, Sewage flows from an outlet into the sea in front of Shati refugee camp in Gaza City. Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip's Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone. The sewage has damaged Gaza's limited fresh water supplies, decimated fishing zones, and after years of neglect, is now floating northward and affecting Israel as well, where a nearby desalination plant was forced to shut down, apparently due to pollution. (AP Photo/Khalil Hamra)

    Gaza sewage poisons coastline, threatens Israel

    SHATI REFUGEE CAMP, Gaza Strip (AP) — Each day, millions of gallons of raw sewage pour into the Gaza Strip’s Mediterranean beachfront, spewing out of a metal pipe and turning miles of once-scenic coastline into a stagnant dead zone.

  • Federal, state officials look to protect Pecos River fish

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal and state officials are partnering on a proposal for a $6 million pipeline that would help sustain an endangered species of fish during New Mexico’s extremely dry times.

  • This April 2016 photo provided by Endangered Wolf Center shows Regina Mossotti, director of Animal Care and Conservation at the Endangered Wolf Center in Eureka, Mo., administering a checkup on a pup named Vida. Federal wildlife officials say they have, for the first time, successfully integrated wolf pups raised in captivity with a wild litter in New Mexico. (Endangered Wolf Center via AP)

    Captive-born wolf pups released into wild den in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal wildlife officials say they have, for the first time, successfully integrated wolf pups raised in captivity with a wild litter in New Mexico.

  • Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett tours the exhibit floor before presiding over the annual shareholders meeting Saturday, April 30, 2016, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

    Berkshire Hathaway event celebrates what makes firm special

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Berkshire Hathaway’s peculiarities were on display again this weekend with tens of thousands of people filling an arena to listen to Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger talk business for hours at the conglomerate’s annual meeting.

  • A worker carries spray bottles of gel fuel to help the burning, as he walks past pyres of ivory that were set on fire in Nairobi National Park, Kenya Saturday, April 30, 2016. Kenya's president Saturday set fire to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

    Kenya to burn huge pile of ivory tusks to protest poaching

    NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya’s president set fire Saturday to 105 tons of elephant ivory and more than 1 ton of rhino horn, believed to be the largest stockpile ever destroyed, in a dramatic statement by this East African country against the trade in ivory and products from endangered species.

  • The controlled gate is seen at the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but only five states, including New Jersey, are actively monitoring for the chemicals used in the foam and spilled by other sources. New Jersey officials say they're focused on the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City, where PFCs, known as perfluorinated compounds, have been found in groundwater and in low levels in municipal wells near the center's fire training area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    Most states do bare minimum on fire-foam contamination

    The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but most states so far show little inclination to examine civilian sites for the same threat.

  • In this photo taken on Thursday, April  7, 2016, an old man fishes in a lake that connects to the nearby Techa River, near the village of Muslyumovo, Chelyabinsk region, Russia, which is polluted with radioactive waste from Mayak nuclear plant. Mayak has been responsible for at least two of the country’s biggest radioactive accidents. Worse, environmentalists say, is the facility’s decades-old record of using the Arctic-bound waters of the Techa River to dump waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel, hundreds of tons of which is imported annually from neighboring nations. (AP Photo/Katherine Jacobsen)

    Russia’s nuclear nightmare flows down radioactive river

    MUSLYUMOVO, Russia (AP) — At first glance, Gilani Dambaev looks like a healthy 60-year-old man and the river flowing past his rural family home appears pristine. But Dambaev is riddled with diseases that his doctors link to a lifetime’s exposure to excessive radiation, and the Geiger counter beeps loudly as a reporter strolls down to the muddy riverbank.

  • New Mexico sues Texas oil company for lease payments

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico State Land Office is suing a Texas-based oil company for years of overdue fees and recent environmental cleanup costs at a waste-water injection well used by various oil producers.