• In this Oct. 6, 2015 photo, Dr. Garen Wintemute poses with a copy of a study he did on gun shows, at his office at the University of California Davis Medical Center in Sacramento, Calif. Wintemute, an emergency doctor, who is board certified in family practice, is a long-time national leader in gun violence, having researched gun accessibility, connections between gun ownership and violence. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

    Gun violence researchers becoming an endangered species?

    NEW YORK (AP) — In a story Oct. 12 about gun violence research, The Associated Press reported erroneously that Newtown, Connecticut, was the deadliest mass slaying at a school in U.S. history. With 26 victims, it was the second-deadliest shooting at a school; 32 were killed at Virginia Tech in 2007. The worst attack at an elementary school was a 1927 bombing that killed 38 children in Bath Township, Michigan.

  • FOR RELEASE FRIDAY, OCT. 9, 2015, AT 3:00 A.M. EDT - In this photo provided by UC Berkeley Public Affairs, taken June 20, 2014 Jennifer Doudna, right, and her lab manager, Kai Hong, work in her laboratory in Berkeley, Calif. The hottest tool in biology has scientists using words like revolutionary as they describe the long-term potential: wiping out certain mosquitoes that carry malaria, treating genetic diseases like sickle-cell, preventing babies from inheriting a life-threatening disorder. "We need to try to get the balance right," said Doudna. She helped develop new gene-editing technology and hears from desperate families, but urges caution in how it's eventually used in people. (Cailey Cotner/UC Berkeley via AP)

    Boom in gene-editing studies amid ethics debate over its use

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The hottest tool in biology has scientists using words like revolutionary as they describe the long-term potential: wiping out certain mosquitoes that carry malaria, treating genetic diseases like sickle cell, preventing babies from inheriting a life-threatening disorder.

  • Thursday, October 8, 2015

    In shift of Syria focus, Pentagon abandoning goal of building new anti-IS rebel force

  • VW may compensate owners of diesel cars for loss of value

    DETROIT (AP) — Volkswagen could compensate owners of diesel-powered cars that emit high levels of pollutants, possibly by paying them for the lost value of their vehicles, the company’s top U.S. executive said Thursday.

  • Volkswagen America CEO Michael Horn adjusts his glasses as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing on Volkswagen's emissions cheating allegations. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    VW’s US CEO to face tough questions in congressional hearing

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Volkswagen’s top U.S. executive offered deep apologies yet sought to distance himself Thursday from the emissions scandal enveloping the world’s largest automaker, asserting top corporate officials had no knowledge of the cheating software installed in 11 million diesel cars.

  • California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks before signing a bill to combat climate change by increasing the state's renewable electricity use to 50 percent and doubling energy efficiency in existing buildings by 2030 at a ceremony at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    California governor signs aggressive climate change bill

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown dramatically increased California’s climate-change goals on Wednesday, committing the state to use renewable energy for half its electricity and make existing buildings twice as energy-efficient in just 15 years.

  • In this May 22, 2013, file photo crews works to contain odors from a slow-burning underground fire smoldering near a cache of nuclear waste at the Bridgeton Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo. Authorities have quietly adopted an emergency plan in case the smoldering embers ever reach the waste, a potentially "catastrophic event" that could release radioactive fallout in a plume of smoke over a densely populated area of suburban St. Louis.  (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Roland Klose, File) MANDADORY CREDIT; EDWARDSVILLE INTELLIGENCER OUT; THE ALTON TELEGRAPH OUT

    Disaster plan developed in case fire reaches nuclear waste

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Beneath the surface of a St. Louis-area landfill lurk two things that should never meet: a slow-burning fire and a cache of Cold War-era nuclear waste, separated by no more than 1,200 feet.

  • U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses the Our Ocean international conference on marine protection in Vina del Mar, Chile, Monday, Oct. 5, 2015. President Barack Obama declared new marine sanctuaries in Lake Michigan and the tidal waters of Maryland on Monday, while Chile blocked off a vast expanse of the Pacific Ocean near the world-famous Easter Island from commercial fishing and oil and gas exploration. (AP Photo/Luis Hidalgo)

    US, Chile declare new marine reserves, fight overfishing

    VALPARAISO, Chile (AP) — In a story Oct. 5 about the United States and Chile setting up new marine sanctuaries, The Associated Press incorrectly quoted Secretary of State John Kerry as saying, “There is literally too much money chasing too much fish.” What Kerry said was, “There is literally too much money chasing too few fish.”