• Lead contamination of Flint water draws multiple lawsuits

    DETROIT (AP) — Residents of Flint have filed lawsuits against almost anyone who may have had a role in supplying the city with water that contained dangerous amounts of lead.

  • In this Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, photo, coal ash is removed from the Dan River Steam Station in Eden, N.C., to be transported by rail to a permanent site in Virginia. Duke Energy Corp. is digging up and hauling away from riverbanks the toxic coal residues two years after one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

    Costs of closing, cleaning toxic coal ash pits grows clearer

    EDEN, N.C. (AP) — Giant earthmoving machines beep and grind as they drop 17-ton scoops of coal ash and dirt into dozens of railroad cars lined up for two-thirds of a mile at a site along the Virginia-North Carolina border, where the country’s largest electricity company was responsible for one of the worst spills of the toxic, liquefied waste in U.S. history.

  • In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 photo, workers help their customers pack fireworks at a store ahead of Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing. Much of China’s population can expect sub-standard sleep after the country starts ringing in the Year of the Monkey. The rat-a-tat snaps of firecrackers, whistling rockets and mortar-like fireworks with possibly enough gunpowder to down a small aircraft will make sure of that. Authorities in Beijing now seem set on the current policy of allowing 24-hour fireworks on New Years Eve and New Years Day and 18-hour windows every day for the following two weeks. But bursts of firework-related mayhem in recent years have prompted officials and media commentators to call for tighter restrictions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    New Year’s fireworks a little quieter in Chinese capital

    BEIJING (AP) — Much of China’s population can expect sub-standard sleep after the country starts ringing in the Year of the Monkey. The rat-a-tat snaps of firecrackers, whistling rockets and mortar-like fireworks with possibly enough gunpowder to down a small aircraft will make sure of that.

  • New Mexico couple: Woman posed as humane worker, stole dog

    RIO COMMUNITIES, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico couple says a woman posing as an Animal Humane employee threatened them with jail and stole one of their dogs.

  • Company in West Virginia chem spill receives ‘symbolic’ fine

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A bankrupt chemical company responsible for a spill that contaminated a West Virginia river and fouled the drinking water supply of 300,000 residents was fined $900,000 on pollution charges Thursday, with a judge noting that Freedom Industries likely could never pay it.

  • In this Dec. 11, 2012 file photo, Gov. Rick Snyder speaks in Lansing, Mich. When Snyder disclosed a spike in Legionnaires’ cases in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 13, 2016, he said he had learned about it just a couple days earlier.  Internal emails however show high-ranking officials in Snyder’s administration were aware of a surge in Legionnaires’ disease potentially linked to Flint’s water long before the governor reported the increase to the public last month. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

    APNewsBreak: Officials warned of water, Legionnaires’ link

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — High-ranking officials in Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration were aware of a surge in Legionnaires’ disease potentially linked to Flint’s water long before the governor reported the increase to the public last month, internal emails show.

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 photo, safety pamphlets written in both English and Spanish are displayed during a pesticide safety training class for farm supervisors in Sebring, Fla. Millions of farm workers do jobs with a high risk of exposure to toxic chemicals every day, yet a federal system of protections meant to improve safety and provide an avenue for reporting exposure is ineffective and riddled with problems, according to an Associated Press review of federal and state enforcement data and case records. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    BELLE GLADE, Fla. (AP) — Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings.

  • Keith Creagh, director, Department of Environmental Quality, State of Michigan, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb.  3, 2016, before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing to examine the ongoing situation in Flint, Mich.  (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

    The Latest: Developments in the Flint water crisis

    DETROIT (AP) — The latest on developments in the lead contamination of Flint’s water (all times local):

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 photo, safety pamphlets written in both English and Spanish are displayed during a pesticide safety training class for farm supervisors in Sebring, Fla. Millions of farm workers do jobs with a high risk of exposure to toxic chemicals every day, yet a federal system of protections meant to improve safety and provide an avenue for reporting exposure is ineffective and riddled with problems, according to an Associated Press review of federal and state enforcement data and case records. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    BELLE GLADE, Fla. (AP) — Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings.

  • In a Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016 file photo,Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder delivers his State of the State address to a joint session of the House and Senate, at the state Capitol in Lansing, Mich. Snyder has released some, but not all, of his government emails related to Flint’s water emergency. The 274 pages cover 2014 and 2015. That includes the 18-month period during which the city switched its water source while under state financial management until it reconnected to Detroit’s system because of lead contamination blamed on state regulatory failures.  Snyder has withheld the emails of others in the executive office along with his own emails from earlier.  (AP Photo/Al Goldis, File)

    Snyder calls for $30M in state help for Flint water bills

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will propose $30 million in state funding to help pay the water bills of Flint residents facing an emergency over the city’s lead-contaminated water supply.