• Company in West Virginia chem spill receives ‘symbolic’ fine

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A bankrupt chemical company responsible for a spill that contaminated a West Virginia river and fouled the drinking water supply of 300,000 residents was fined $900,000 on pollution charges Thursday, with a judge noting that Freedom Industries likely could never pay it.

  • In this Dec. 11, 2012 file photo, Gov. Rick Snyder speaks in Lansing, Mich. When Snyder disclosed a spike in Legionnaires’ cases in Flint, Mich., on Jan. 13, 2016, he said he had learned about it just a couple days earlier.  Internal emails however show high-ranking officials in Snyder’s administration were aware of a surge in Legionnaires’ disease potentially linked to Flint’s water long before the governor reported the increase to the public last month. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)

    APNewsBreak: Officials warned of water, Legionnaires’ link

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — High-ranking officials in Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder’s administration were aware of a surge in Legionnaires’ disease potentially linked to Flint’s water long before the governor reported the increase to the public last month, internal emails show.

  • Measure supports storing spent nuclear fuel in New Mexico

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico lawmakers are considering a pair of nonbinding measures that would signal support for the development of a temporary storage facility to house spent nuclear fuel that has been piling up at reactors around the nation.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016 photo, children look at Hanako the elephant at Inokashira Park Zoo on the outskirts of Tokyo. An online petition drive wants the 69-year-old Hanako, or "flower child," to be moved to a Thai sanctuary, to live in a natural, grassy habitat where elephants romp in herds, not alone in her concrete pen, with a wading pool she hardly uses and a nearby side building to spend the night. It’s attracted tens of thousands of signatures already, with the aim of submitting them to the suburban Tokyo zoo and the Japanese government. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Move sought for Japan’s oldest elephant may be too late

    TOKYO (AP) — In the humble zoo, among the small cages of owls, guinea pigs and raccoons, Japan’s oldest elephant stands in a concrete pen about the size of half of a basketball court. She drinks sugar water from a bucket and munches on bananas with her last remaining tooth while a debate is being waged about where she should live out her final years.

  • Bubba Watson on TPC Scottsdale: ‘I don’t like it at all.’

    SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. (AP) — Bubba Watson took a big swing at TPC Scottsdale’s Stadium Course — with his mouth, not his driver.

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 photo, safety pamphlets written in both English and Spanish are displayed during a pesticide safety training class for farm supervisors in Sebring, Fla. Millions of farm workers do jobs with a high risk of exposure to toxic chemicals every day, yet a federal system of protections meant to improve safety and provide an avenue for reporting exposure is ineffective and riddled with problems, according to an Associated Press review of federal and state enforcement data and case records. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    BELLE GLADE, Fla. (AP) — Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings.

  • Keith Creagh, director, Department of Environmental Quality, State of Michigan, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Feb.  3, 2016, before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing to examine the ongoing situation in Flint, Mich.  (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

    The Latest: Developments in the Flint water crisis

    DETROIT (AP) — The latest on developments in the lead contamination of Flint’s water (all times local):

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 photo, safety pamphlets written in both English and Spanish are displayed during a pesticide safety training class for farm supervisors in Sebring, Fla. Millions of farm workers do jobs with a high risk of exposure to toxic chemicals every day, yet a federal system of protections meant to improve safety and provide an avenue for reporting exposure is ineffective and riddled with problems, according to an Associated Press review of federal and state enforcement data and case records. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    BELLE GLADE, Fla. (AP) — Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings.

  • In a Tuesday, Jan. 19, 2016 file photo,Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder delivers his State of the State address to a joint session of the House and Senate, at the state Capitol in Lansing, Mich. Snyder has released some, but not all, of his government emails related to Flint’s water emergency. The 274 pages cover 2014 and 2015. That includes the 18-month period during which the city switched its water source while under state financial management until it reconnected to Detroit’s system because of lead contamination blamed on state regulatory failures.  Snyder has withheld the emails of others in the executive office along with his own emails from earlier.  (AP Photo/Al Goldis, File)

    Snyder calls for $30M in state help for Flint water bills

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder will propose $30 million in state funding to help pay the water bills of Flint residents facing an emergency over the city’s lead-contaminated water supply.

  • FILE-- A no-smoking sign with written in black "in the presence of infants and children including 12-year-olds, and of pregnant women"  is put up in a Naples playground, southern Italy, in this Monday Nov. 19, 2007 file photo. Smokers in Italy are now facing fines of up to 500 euros ($600) if they light up in a car with a child or pregnant woman _ or if they toss a cigarette butt on the street _ after new health and environmental laws went into effect Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016.  (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta )

    Smokers in Italy hit with new fines to protect the young

    ROME (AP) — Smokers in Italy are now facing fines of up to 500 euros ($600) if they light up in a car with a child or pregnant woman — or if they toss a cigarette butt on the street — after new health and environmental laws went into effect Tuesday.