• Suspected ivory smuggler released on bond by Kenyan court

    MOMBASA, Kenya (AP) — A Kenyan court released the suspected leader of an ivory trafficking ring on bail Friday, causing an uproar among conservationists who fear he may flee or tamper with witnesses.

  • This Aug. 5, 2015, photo provided by Friends of Verde River Greenway shows a tablet used to collect field data of salt cedar in Cottonwood, Ariz. The tiny seedling was brought over from Eastern Europe and parts of Asia nearly 200 years ago and planted along riverbanks across the United States, mostly in the Southwest, to prevent erosion. It grew fast, its thick branches and oily leaves spreading across five states. (Anna Schrenk/Friends of Verde River Greenway via AP)

    Q&A: Southwest struggles to stem fire-fueling invasive plant

    PHOENIX (AP) — The tiny seedling was brought over from Eastern Europe and parts of Asia nearly 200 years ago and planted along riverbanks across the United States, mostly in the Southwest, to prevent erosion. It grew fast, its thick branches and oily leaves spreading across five states.

  • Mississippi wildlife commission passes deer baiting

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Member of the Mississippi Commission on Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks have voted unanimously in favor of baiting deer.

  • Employees of Rio de Janeiro's water and sewage utility work on a sewage collection system in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Wednesday, Aug. 19, 2015. Head of the utility, Jorge Briard, has acknowledged "problems" with the city's sewage-filled Guanabara Bay but insisted the Olympic city will eventually reach its goal of collecting and treating all the waste currently dumped into the waterway. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Head of Rio’s water utility sees ‘problems’ in Olympic bay

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The head of Rio de Janeiro’s water utility has acknowledged “problems” with the city’s sewage-filled Guanabara Bay but insisted the Olympic city will eventually reach its goal of collecting and treating all the waste currently dumped into the waterway.

  • Land donated for wildlife refuge north of Greenwood

    MONEY, Miss. (AP) — State officials say 293 acres north of Greenwood has been donated for a wildlife preserve.

  • Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt flexes his muscles jokingly while responding to a question from members of the media during a press conference, Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015, in Beijing, China. Bolt will be competing in the upcoming World Athletics Championships in Beijing, where he will look to retain his Men's 100 meter and 200 meter world titles. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    Less than perfect, Usain Bolt still favored in 100 at worlds

    BEIJING (AP) — Usain Bolt’s coach believes he looks good. So if Glen Mills is happy, Bolt is happy.

  • This Aug. 5, 2015, photo provided by Friends of Verde River Greenway shows a tablet used to collect field data of salt cedar in Cottonwood, Ariz. The tiny seedling was brought over from Eastern Europe and parts of Asia nearly 200 years ago and planted along riverbanks across the United States, mostly in the Southwest, to prevent erosion. It grew fast, its thick branches and oily leaves spreading across five states. (Anna Schrenk/Friends of Verde River Greenway via AP)

    Q&A: The story behind an invasive plant in the southwest

    PHOENIX (AP) — The tiny seedling was brought over from Eastern Europe and parts of Asia nearly 200 years ago and planted along riverbanks across the United States, mostly in the southwest, to prevent erosion. It grew fast, its thick branches and oily leaves spreading out across five states in the West.

  • This Oct. 3, 2012 file photo shows buildings behind Railroad Park in downtown Birmingham, Ala. Clusters of landlocked municipalities more than 100 miles from the Gulf Coast, including Birmingham which is over 200 miles away, have secured millions of dollars in BP money through settlements designed to compensate local governments for lost tourism dollars and other economic damage from the company’s 2010 oil spill, according to records obtained by The Associated Press in August 2015. (Mark Almond/AL.com via AP) MAGS OUT

    BP settlement money flows to governments in far-flung places

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Clusters of landlocked municipalities more than 100 miles from the Gulf Coast have secured millions of dollars in BP money through settlements designed to compensate local governments for lost tourism dollars and other economic damage from the company’s 2010 oil spill, according to records obtained by The Associated Press.

  • Jackson Hotshots' firefighters, from Jackson, Miss., stand with hands and helmets over their hearts as they watch a motorcade carrying the bodies of firefighters killed a day earlier while fighting a wildfire drive past Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015, in Twisp, Wash. Authorities say three firefighters died after their vehicle crashed and was apparently caught by a "hellstorm" of flames as they battled a blaze in Washington state. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

    3 firefighters die in wildfire after vehicle crashes

    TWISP, Wash. (AP) — The firefighters — members of a specially trained unit that is sent into danger ahead of everyone else to size up a wildfire — rushed up a narrow, winding gravel road with steep hills on either side.

  • Soldiers from a People's Liberation Army chemical-defense unit work to neutralize sodium cyanide residue on the site of massive explosions at a port in northeastern China's Tianjin Municipality Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015. Officials have ordered nationwide checks on dangerous materials, and the Chinese military said it was inspecting storage measures for weapons, ammunition, and fuel as well as chemical, explosive and toxic materials, the official newspaper People's Liberation Army Daily reported. (Chinatopix Via AP) CHINA OUT

    State media: China firm used connections for hazmat permit

    TIANJIN, China (AP) — High levels of toxic chemicals remained inside the core area in the Chinese city of Tianjin on Friday, more than a week after a massive warehouse explosion that killed at least 114.