• In this Aug. 14, 2015 file photo, water flows through a series of sediment retention ponds built to reduce heavy metal and chemical contaminants from the Gold King Mine wastewater accident, in the spillway about a quarter mile downstream from the mine outside Silverton, Colo. Federal and state regulators underestimated the potential for a toxic blowout from the Colorado mine, despite warnings more than a year earlier that a large-volume spill of wastewater was possible, an internal government investigation released Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015 found. The massive spill occurred on Aug. 5 when a government cleanup crew doing excavation work triggered the release of an estimated 3 million gallons of sludge that fouled hundreds of miles of rivers in Colorado, New Mexico and Utah.  (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, File)

    Investigation: EPA, state missed potential for mine blowout

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — Members of a federal cleanup crew were initially trapped and unable to warn downstream communities that they had accidentally unleashed toxic waste water from a Colorado gold mine, according to government documents released Thursday.

  • In this July 12, 2014 photo, a bow fisherman scans the surface of the Illinois River for Asian carp during the Peoria Flying Fish Festival & Bow Fishing Tournament. While this tournament did not draw complaints, a fishing tournament on the Mississippi drew so many complaints over loud airboats and powerful lights that state and federal regulators decided to consider tighter restrictions on the fast-growing but little-known sport. (Ting Shen/Journal Star via AP)

    Bowfishing tournament in Mississippi River draws complaints

    IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — The teams of fishermen arrived with a seemingly unusual array of equipment — loud airboats, powerful searchlights and scores of bows and arrows.

  • New Mexico monitoring wildfires’ impact on air quality

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — State health and environment officials are closely monitoring New Mexico air quality in the wake of wildfires still burning in the Pacific Northwest.

  • In this July 23, 2015 photo, Efrem Garza stands before his new home built on the lot of his previous house that was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina and holds a photograph taken by a friend of the remains of that house on South Seashore Avenue in Long Beach, Miss. Before the storm Garza was surrounded by houses and trees, now 10 years later, there are only two houses on that land, as few of the residents returned and rebuilt. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    On Mississippi’s shore, what Katrina erased not yet replaced

    LONG BEACH, Miss. (AP) — Between Mississippi’s seashore and the railroad tracks a little ways inland, where Hurricane Katrina all but erased a neighborhood 10 years ago, Efrem Garza and a handful of other homeowners are still resettling a frontier.

  • Roofers with Hull Brothers Roofing & Waterproofing resurface townhomes roofs at the Marina del Rey seaside community of Los Angeles on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. While drought-plagued California is eager for rain, the forecast of a potentially Godzilla-like El Nino event has communities clearing out debris basins, urging residents to stock up on emergency supplies and even talking about how a deluge could affect the 50th Super Bowl. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    Drought-plagued California readies for El Nino storms

    SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — While drought-plagued California is eager for rain, the forecast of a potentially Godzilla-like El Nino event has communities clearing out debris basins, urging residents to stock up on emergency supplies and even talking about how a deluge could affect the 50th Super Bowl.

  • A sign warns of heavy smoke on Washington state route 155 near Omak, Wash., Wednesday, Aug. 26, 2015. Wildfires in the area have generated heavy smoke that has slowed traffic and in some instances hindered efforts to fight the fires from the air. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

    Fire crews eye weather as heat, wind build in parts of West

    SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Smoke from big wildfires burning east of the Cascade Range hurt air quality Wednesday and hampered efforts by crews battling the flames in Washington state.

  • This Tuesday, Aug. 18, 2015, photo shows a gate on leading into property owned by entertainer Bill Cosby in Shelburne, Mass., tells uninvited guests not to enter. Town residents said the 78-year-old star, his wife and at least one of their daughters have been spending much of their summer -- as they typically do -- in the secluded country estate they’ve owned in the southern edge of town since the 1970s. (AP Photo/Philip Marcelo)

    Residents of New England town reluctantly reckon with Cosby

    SHELBURNE FALLS, Mass. (AP) — Deep in the rolling farmland of western Massachusetts, Bill Cosby’s compound has for decades provided quiet refuge for the comedian and his family.

  • Mack Ralbovsky, left, of the Rainforest Reptile Shows, gets assistance from Vermont game wardens Tim Carey, center, and Wes Butler as they remove a reticulated python, between 17 and 18 feet long, from the home of Pat Howard Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015, in North Clarendon, Vt. Howard got the female snake and a slightly smaller male on Sunday from a person in New York, but turned them over to game wardens because he doesn't have a license to keep them and they are too big. The wardens sent the snakes to the Rainforest Reptile Shows in Massachusetts, which will care for them. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring) (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    2 homeless pythons given to Vermont man headed to sanctuary

    NORTH CLARENDON, Vt. (AP) — Two giant southeast Asian pythons that were rescued by a long-time snake collector and were turned over to state game wardens are headed to a sanctuary.

  • In this Sept. 19, 2006, file photo, supporters of the football team at Washington High School in Massillon, Ohio, collect donations at the high school's Paul Brown Tiger Stadium to care for a tiger cub leased to serve as the team's mascot, "Obie." The football team has had a live tiger cub mascot at games for decades, but the team's 2015 season may begin without a tiger cub at games unless state officials receive an affidavit required by Ohio's revised wildlife regulations enacted in 2012, attesting tiger cubs leased to serve as mascots will live at an accredited facility and be cared for throughout their lives. (Glenn B. Dettman/The Independent via AP, File)

    Mascot fight between school, Ohio goes down to the wire

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A high school football team that has featured a tiger cub at games for decades might kick off the season without its beloved mascot because of rules implemented after a suicidal man released dozens of dangerous animals in 2011.

  • Albuquerque mayor urges Forest Service to withdraw proposal

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The mayor of New Mexico’s largest city is urging the U.S. Forest Service to withdraw consideration of a potential wilderness designation that he says would limit the public’s access to a popular recreation area bordering Albuquerque.