• Cops: Fleeing man jumps into river, runs naked from hospital

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — Police say a Pittsburgh man driving a stolen car ditched the vehicle and jumped into a river to escape from authorities. Police say after being captured, he fled naked from a hospital and hid inside a dumpster.

  • In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, members of a media tour group wearing a protective suit and a mask walk together after they receive a briefing from Tokyo Electric Power Co. employees (in blue) in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In an AP interview, a chief architect of an “ice wall” being built into the ground around the broken Fukushima nuclear plant defends the project but acknowledges it won’t be watertight, and as much as 50 tons of radiated water will still accumulate each day. TEPCO, the utility that operates the facility, resorted to the $312 million frozen barrier after it became clear that something had to be done to stem the flow of water into and out of the broken reactors so that they can be dismantled. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    AP Interview: Fukushima plant’s new ice wall not watertight

    TOKYO (AP) — Coping with the vast amounts of ground water flowing into the broken Fukushima nuclear plant — which then becomes radiated and seeps back out — has become such a problem that Japan is building a 35 billion yen ($312 million) “ice wall” into the earth around it.

  • Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller attends the company's annual press conference in Wolfsburg, Germany, Thursday, April 28, 2016. Mueller sketched out a wide-ranging transformation of the company that will see it focus more on electric vehicles and services like car-sharing as it seeks to get past its scandal over cheating on diesel emissions tests. (AP Photo/Markus Schreiber)

    Volkswagen vows to fix diesels, launch new electric vehicles

    FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Volkswagen’s CEO says he apologized in person to U.S. President Barack Obama for the carmaker’s emissions scandal, in which it rigged its cars to cheat on diesel engine pollution tests.

  • The view from the 16th floor of a Pentagon City hotel Wednesday, April 27, 2016, in Arlington, Va., shows the bulk of land of a proposed 38-acre expansion the Army hopes to use to expand Arlington National Cemetery and extend the life of the facility by 20 years, into the mid-2050s. Army officials held a briefing and community forum at the hotel  to explain their plans for the $274 million project, which include a land swap with Arlington County to improve traffic on a busy commuter corridor. (AP Photo/Matthew Barakat)

    Army studies 38-acre Arlington National Cemetery expansion

    ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — The Army is beginning a yearlong environmental assessment of a proposed 38-acre expansion of Arlington National Cemetery that it hopes will extend the life of the facility by 20 years.

  • Appeal rejected in off-road vehicles case on forest use

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A federal appeals court has rejected an appeal by a motorized off-road vehicles users group that challenged a Forest Service decision reducing the routes available for use in the Santa Fe National Forest in northern New Mexico

  • In this April 18, 2016 file photo, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder fills jugs with filtered tap water at Cheryl Hill's house, in Flint, Mich. Snyder says he will drink Flint's water for roughly a month to show residents it is safe. In proposing a tougher limit for lead in drinking water, Snyder wants to lift Michigan from the depths of the Flint crisis to being a model for water safety that can help assess whether the current national rules governing lead are too lax.  (Jake May/The Flint Journal-MLive.com via AP File) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL INTERNET OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT

    Michigan governor seeks tougher lead limit for state, nation

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — In proposing a tougher limit for lead in drinking water, Gov. Rick Snyder wants to lift Michigan from the depths of the Flint crisis to being a national model for lead monitoring that could help assess whether current rules are too lax.

  • In this Tuesday, April 26, 2016 photo, an elephant opens its mouth while being sprayed water to cool off at Dusit Zoo in Bangkok, Thailand. Authorities are telling people to stay out of the blazing sun to avoid heat stroke. April in Thailand is typically hot and sweaty but his year's scorching weather has set a record for the longest heat wave in at least 65 years. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Thailand is used to hot Aprils, but not this hot!

    BANGKOK (AP) — Animals at Bangkok’s zoo are being fed special frozen fruit pops. People are flocking to shopping malls just to soak up the air-conditioning. Authorities are telling people to stay out of the blazing sun to avoid heat stroke.

  • This April 10, 2016 photo shows trekkers heading to Everest Base Camp, Nepal. The cone-shaped Pumo Ri peak (23,495 feet (7,161 meters) is seen in the background. A trek to Everest Base Camp along mountain paths that hug deep gorges offers renewal and a test of mental and physical limits. Along the way there are sore knees and altitude sickness, but the spectacular landscapes, friendly villagers and moments of tranquility make the journey an unforgettable experience. (AP Photo/Karin Laub)

    On trek to Everest, a chance to push boundaries, find peace

    EVEREST BASE CAMP, Nepal (AP) — We reach Everest Base Camp on a sunny but chilly afternoon, after an eight-day trek that stretched our physical and mental limits.

  • Correction: Alaska-Bear Mauling story

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — In stories April 20 and earlier about the mauling of a University of Alaska Southeast outdoors professor leading students in a mountaineering class, The Associated Press reported erroneously a student had to hike to a different area to get cell reception to call for help. Alaska State Troopers now say the student was seeking a satellite signal not cellphone reception.

  • State to draft plan to grow endangered bird’s population

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State wildlife officials will draft a plan to help protect an endangered bird species that is part of the grouse family.