• Lawsuit alleges Tennessee has ‘hostile sexual environment’

    KNOXVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A lawsuit filed by a group of women alleges that the University of Tennessee has violated Title IX regulations and created a “hostile sexual environment” through a policy of indifference toward assaults by student-athletes.

    Updated: 4:26 pm

  • This Oct. 12, 2015 photo provided by the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission shows an alligator in the kitchen of a Wendy's Restaurant in Loxahatchee, Fla. Florida wildlife officials say that 24-year-old Joshua James threw a 3.5-foot alligator through a fast-food restaurant's drive-thru window in October. He's charged with assault with a deadly weapon. On Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, bail was set at $6,000. (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission via AP)

    Fries with that? Man accused of tossing gator at drive-thru

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Alligators have been used as shoes, briefcases, university mascots, lunch and now, authorities say, a deadly weapon.

    Updated: 5:25 pm

  • In this Nov. 5, 2015, file photo, trash floats in the Meriti River, which flows into Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A major Brazilian daily said Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, that the Rio de Janeiro state governor wants to use money earmarked for an environmental fund to cover shortfalls in civil servants’ pensions. The Rio de Janeiro State Environmental Protection Fund has been used to improve sewage treatment centers and begin cleaning lakes, rivers and Guanabara Bay, a water sports venue for the upcoming Olympic games. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)

    Brazil governor wants environmental fund to pay pensions

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Rio de Janeiro state governor wants to use money earmarked for an environmental fund being used to clean up waterways before the upcoming Olympics to cover shortfalls in civil servants’ pensions, a major Brazilian daily said Tuesday.

    Updated: 1:18 pm

  • In this Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016 photo, a woman stands in the doorway of then new Historic Colored Entrance at the Lyric Theatre, in Birmingham, Ala. Preservationists had to decide whether to keep reminders of The Lyric’s discarded color line before they unveiled an $11 million restoration of the 102-year-old theater, which had been closed for decades. In this case, they chose to highlight the history, installing a glass door with the etched words “Historic Colored Entrance” in the lobby wall so patrons can peer into the past. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

    What should be done with architecture of white supremacy?

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Growing up in the 1950s, William Bell had to enter Birmingham’s segregated Lyric Theatre though a side entrance, marked “COLORED,” that was walled-off from the elegant lobby. He climbed a dimly lit stairwell to watch movies from the steep balcony where black patrons had to sit for generations.

    Updated: 9:57 am

  • In this March 29, 2014 file photo, two women with Japanese traditional clothing or kimonos stroll to see cherry blossoms at Sumida Park near the Tokyo Skytree skyscraper in the background in Tokyo. Japan is gearing up for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics with gusto, investing in everything from stadiums to electric cars, and expecting an economic bonanza from a construction frenzy and an influx of visitors. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    Japan worried about 2020 problem, or life after the Olympics

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan is gearing up for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics with gusto, investing in everything from stadiums to electric cars, and expecting an economic bonanza from a construction frenzy and an influx of visitors.

  • Eagles release wide receiver Riley Cooper after 6 seasons

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The Philadelphia Eagles say they have released wide receiver Riley Cooper after six seasons.

  • In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 image from video, Luke Waid discusses the lead-contamination in Flint’s water as he watches his 2-year-old daughter, Sophia, and infant son, Luke Jr, in their Flint, Mich., home. A federal lawsuit filed Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, seeks unspecified damages from Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, the state of Michigan and city of Flint claiming Sophia has been sickened by the city’s water. (AP Photo/Mike Householder)

    Lead contamination of Flint water draws multiple lawsuits

    DETROIT (AP) — One lawsuit seeks to replace lead-leaching water lines at no cost to customers. Another seeks money for thousands of Flint residents who unwittingly drank toxic water. A third complaint has been filed on behalf of people with Legionnaires’ disease.

  • In this Thursday, Jan. 14, 2016, photo, coal ash is removed from the Dan River Steam Station in Eden, N.C., to be transported by rail to a permanent site in Virginia. Duke Energy Corp. is digging up and hauling away from riverbanks the toxic coal residues two years after one of the worst coal-ash spills in U.S. history. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

    Costs of closing, cleaning toxic coal ash pits grows clearer

    EDEN, N.C. (AP) — Giant earthmoving machines beep and grind as they drop 17-ton scoops of coal ash and dirt into dozens of railroad cars lined up for two-thirds of a mile at a site along the Virginia-North Carolina border, where the country’s largest electricity company was responsible for one of the worst spills of the toxic, liquefied waste in U.S. history.

  • Massachusetts plan could spur hydro imports to New England

    BOSTON (AP) — Tapping into Canadian hydropower is hardly a new concept in energy-starved New England. But Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker’s proposal to authorize long-term contracts between utilities and hydropower producers is being viewed in some quarters as a potential game-changer for the region.

  • In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 photo, workers help their customers pack fireworks at a store ahead of Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing. Much of China’s population can expect sub-standard sleep after the country starts ringing in the Year of the Monkey. The rat-a-tat snaps of firecrackers, whistling rockets and mortar-like fireworks with possibly enough gunpowder to down a small aircraft will make sure of that. Authorities in Beijing now seem set on the current policy of allowing 24-hour fireworks on New Years Eve and New Years Day and 18-hour windows every day for the following two weeks. But bursts of firework-related mayhem in recent years have prompted officials and media commentators to call for tighter restrictions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    New Year’s fireworks a little quieter in Chinese capital

    BEIJING (AP) — Much of China’s population can expect sub-standard sleep after the country starts ringing in the Year of the Monkey. The rat-a-tat snaps of firecrackers, whistling rockets and mortar-like fireworks with possibly enough gunpowder to down a small aircraft will make sure of that.