• Groups urge feds to release more Mexican wolves

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — More than three dozen environmental groups asked the federal government Thursday to release at least five packs of Mexican gray wolves in New Mexico to bolster the genetics of the endangered predators.

    Updated: 6:05 pm

  • 2016 Olympic equestrian events may not be held in Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The equestrian events for next year’s Olympics in Rio de Janeiro might have to take place outside Brazil, the head of the country’s equestrian confederation has warned.

  • Thursday, October 8, 2015

    EU agrees measures to efficiently deport migrants not eligible for asylum, buttress borders

    Updated: 9:00 pm

  • VW may compensate owners of diesel cars for loss of value

    DETROIT (AP) — Volkswagen could compensate owners of diesel-powered cars that emit high levels of pollutants, possibly by paying them for the lost value of their vehicles, the company’s top U.S. executive said Thursday.

  • Volkswagen America CEO Michael Horn adjusts his glasses as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing on Volkswagen's emissions cheating allegations. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    VW’s US CEO to face tough questions in congressional hearing

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Volkswagen’s top U.S. executive offered deep apologies yet sought to distance himself Thursday from the emissions scandal enveloping the world’s largest automaker, asserting top corporate officials had no knowledge of the cheating software installed in 11 million diesel cars.

    Updated: 2:27 pm

  • California Gov. Jerry Brown speaks before signing a bill to combat climate change by increasing the state's renewable electricity use to 50 percent and doubling energy efficiency in existing buildings by 2030 at a ceremony at the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2015. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    California governor signs aggressive climate change bill

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown dramatically increased California’s climate-change goals on Wednesday, committing the state to use renewable energy for half its electricity and make existing buildings twice as energy-efficient in just 15 years.

  • In this May 22, 2013, file photo crews works to contain odors from a slow-burning underground fire smoldering near a cache of nuclear waste at the Bridgeton Landfill in Bridgeton, Mo. Authorities have quietly adopted an emergency plan in case the smoldering embers ever reach the waste, a potentially "catastrophic event" that could release radioactive fallout in a plume of smoke over a densely populated area of suburban St. Louis.  (AP Photo/St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Roland Klose, File) MANDADORY CREDIT; EDWARDSVILLE INTELLIGENCER OUT; THE ALTON TELEGRAPH OUT

    Disaster plan developed in case fire reaches nuclear waste

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — Beneath the surface of a St. Louis-area landfill lurk two things that should never meet: a slow-burning fire and a cache of Cold War-era nuclear waste, separated by no more than 1,200 feet.

  • Federal grant aims to bring recycling to New Mexico tribes

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico Recycling Coalition will be developing a training program and providing technical assistance to help Native American communities around the state with recycling programs.

  • In this Monday, Sept. 14, 2015, file photo, a Malaysian police officer wears a mask as he stands in front of the Petronas Twin Towers shrouded by haze in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Scientists predict the haze this year is on track to surpass 1997 levels when pollution soared to record highs in an environmental disaster that cost an estimated $9 billion. A bad bout of haze resembles wintry fog, but laced with tiny particles of ash that are particularly harmful to the elderly, children and those with chronic heart and lung conditions. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul, File)

    Neighbors turn up the heat on Indonesia over forest fires

    SINGAPORE (AP) — For weeks now, the quality of life in parts of Southeast Asia has been left to sheer chance — the direction of the wind. Every day, it alone determines which city will be shrouded by peaty white smoke blowing from burning forests in Indonesia.

  • Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe speaks about the agreement on the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal at Abe's official residence in Tokyo, Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2015. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    United States, 11 Pacific Rim countries reach trade deal

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The United States and 11 other Pacific Rim countries reached a contentious trade pact that cuts trade barriers, sets labor and environmental standards and protects the intellectual property of multinational corporations. Now each country must sell the deal to skeptical lawmakers.