• In this Nov. 20, 2014 file photo, Senate Commerce Committee member Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Fla. holds an example of the defective airbag made by Takata of Japan that has been linked to multiple deaths and injuries in cars driven in the U.S. during the committee's hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. According to documents posted Friday, Feb. 12, 2016, on the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration website, Volkswagen resisted U.S. government efforts to recall more cars and trucks to fix potentially deadly Takata air bags — telling safety regulators that a recall isn't necessary. But the German automaker, already in hot water with the government for cheating on U.S. pollution tests, eventually agreed to the recall. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

    Documents show Volkswagen resisted Takata air bag recall

    DETROIT (AP) — Volkswagen resisted U.S. government efforts to recall more cars and trucks to fix potentially deadly Takata air bags — telling safety regulators that a recall isn’t necessary.

  • New Mexico officials support proposed methane rules

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A group of local and state elected leaders is supporting a federal proposal that would clamp down on oil and gas companies that burn off natural gas on public land.

  • HOLD FOR STORY BY DAVID EGGERT- FILE- In a file photo from Feb. 5, 2016, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, center and Our Lady of Guadalupe Church Deacon Omar Odette, right, meet with volunteers helping to load vehicles with bottled water in Flint, Mich. Snyder's standing as one of the GOP's most accomplished governors has taken a beating in the lead-contaminated water emergency in Flint. Democrats, especially those running for president, are pointing to mistakes by Snyder's administration during the crisis as a vivid example of Republican-style cost-cutting run amok. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Flint crisis may help governor ease GOP doubt on Detroit aid

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Rick Snyder’s standing as one of the GOP’s most accomplished governors has taken a beating in the crisis over lead-contaminated water in Flint, Michigan. Democrats, especially those running for president, have pointed to his administration’s mishandling of the city’s switch to a cheaper water supply as an example of Republican cost-cutting run amok.

    Updated: 5:30 am

  • Former Freedom Industries owner and president Dennis Farrell walks into federal Court in Charleston W.Va., Thursday Feb. 11, 2016.  Farrell is scheduled to be sentenced for his conviction on a pollution charge in a 2014 chemical spill into a Charleston river that prompted a tap water ban for 300,000 residents for days.  (Tom Hindman/Charleston Gazette-Mail via AP)

    Ex-exe sentenced to 1 month in West Virginia chemical spill

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A former Freedom Industries executive was sentenced Thursday to one month in federal prison for a chemical spill that fouled the drinking water supply of 300,000 West Virginians.

  • FILE- In this July 30, 2015 file photo, Richard Budgett, the IOC medical director, speaks to the Associated Press during an interview in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Seeking to calm fears over the Zika outbreak, the IOC medical director told The Associated Press on Thursday Feb. 11, 2016 that “everything that can be done is being done’’ to combat the virus in Brazil and provide safe conditions for athletes at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File)

    AP Interview: IOC medical chief seeks to allay Zika fears

    LONDON (AP) — Seeking to allay fears over the Zika outbreak, the IOC medical director said “everything that can be done is being done” to combat the virus in Brazil and provide safe conditions for athletes at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

  • A closed Sod House Lane, about 4 miles outside of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon, displays an electronic sign warning of arrest, Thursday morning, Feb. 11, 2016, near Burns, Ore. The last four armed occupiers of the national wildlife refuge in eastern Oregon said they would turn themselves in Thursday morning, after law officers surrounded them in a tense standoff.  (AP Photo/Rebecca Boone)

    The Latest: Occupiers say they’re preparing to surrender

    BURNS, Ore. (AP) — The Latest on the standoff at a national wildlife refuge in Oregon (all times local):

  • Survey: Solar workforce grows in New Mexico

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State energy officials say the solar industry’s workforce is growing in New Mexico.

  • FBI Special Agent in Charge Greg Bretzing, at podium, talks to reporters at the Chamber of Commerce in Burns, Ore., Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. The end of a nearly six-week-long standoff at an Oregon wildlife refuge played out live on the Internet, with tens of thousands of people listening as supporters encouraged the last armed occupiers to surrender. The holdouts surrendered Thursday, having refused to leave Malheur National Wildlife Refuge after the group's leaders were arrested last month.(AP Photo/Rebecca Boone)

    Occupiers at Oregon refuge say they’ll turn themselves in

    BURNS, Ore. (AP) — With the FBI tightening its ring around them, the last four holdouts in the armed takeover of a national wildlife refuge in Oregon surrendered Thursday, ending a 41-day standoff that left one man dead and exposed simmering anger over the government’s control of vast expanses of Western land.

  • In this file photo from Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, waves crash near a damaged section of seawall in Pacifica, Calif. Living with the Pacific Ocean as your backyard has its benefits. But the crumbling ocean cliffs have forced dozens to move quickly and at a high cost. Still, others remain, unsure of when the call to leave might come. The toll has been heavy in recent years. In 2010, two apartment buildings undermined by previous storms were evacuated and face demolition. Last month, during El Nino storms, the residents of another apartment building and two homes were forced to move out. Continuing erosion has left these three neighboring apartments sitting unsafely on the edge of an 80-foot bluff. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

    Pacifica: Residents live on the edge of crumbling cliffs

    PACIFICA, Calif. (AP) — Sonja Thompson lives so close to the edge of an 80-foot bluff above the Pacific Ocean that when paragliders fly by “you can almost high-five them.”

  • Workers holds a flag that reads in portugues "Out Zika" as part of a campaign to warn people about the spread of the Zika virus during carnival celebrations at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Aussie Olympic doctor says Rio water bigger worry than Zika

    BRISBANE, Australia (AP) — The Australian team’s medical director says water quality will be more of a threat to the health of athletes and officials at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro than the mosquito-borne Zika virus.