• This July 31, 2012 file photo shows the euro sculpture in front of the headquarters of the European Central Bank, ECB, in Frankfurt, Germany. The eurozone economy has finally recouped all the ground lost in the recessions of the past eight years after official figures Friday April 29, 2016. showed that the 19-country single currency bloc expanded by a quarterly rate of 0.6 percent in the first three months of the year. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    Eurozone economy regains size of 2008 but remains shaky

    LONDON (AP) — It’s been a long and tortuous journey, but the eurozone economy is finally back to the size it was before the global financial crisis.

  • In this Monday, Feb. 8, 2016, file photo, gas prices are displayed at a Chevron gas station in Sacramento, Calif. Chevron reports financial results Friday, April 29, 2016. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

    Exxon sees smallest profit in 16 years, Chevron posts loss

    DALLAS (AP) — Motorists are saving billions on cheaper gasoline, but the long slump in oil prices is taking a heavy toll on companies that find and produce crude.

  • US rig count drops 11 this week to 420, another all-time low

    HOUSTON (AP) — The number of rigs exploring for oil and natural gas in the U.S. dropped by 11 this week to 420, again reaching an-time low amid depressed energy industry prices.

  • A search and rescue vessel patrols off the coast of the island of Turoey, near Bergen, Norway, as emergency workers attend the scene after a helicopter crashed believed to be have 13 people aboard, Friday April 29, 2016.  A helicopter carrying around 13 people from an offshore oil field crashed Friday near the western Norwegian city of Bergen, police said. Many are feared dead.  (Rune Nielsen / NTB scanpix via AP) NORWAY OUT

    11 dead, 2 missing after oil-rig helicopter crash off Norway

    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — An oil-rig helicopter crashed Friday on an island off the coast of western Norway, killing 11 people and leaving two others missing, a rescue official said.

  • The controlled gate is seen at the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City Tuesday, April 26, 2016, in Egg Harbor Township, N.J. The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but only five states, including New Jersey, are actively monitoring for the chemicals used in the foam and spilled by other sources. New Jersey officials say they're focused on the Federal Aviation Administration's technical center near Atlantic City, where PFCs, known as perfluorinated compounds, have been found in groundwater and in low levels in municipal wells near the center's fire training area. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

    Most states do bare minimum on fire-foam contamination

    The military is checking U.S. bases for potential groundwater contamination from a toxic firefighting foam, but most states so far show little inclination to examine civilian sites for the same threat.

  • Xcel Energy approves $40M in new transmission projects

    CARLSBAD, N.M. (AP) — More than 30 miles of transmission lines and several electrical substations will be upgraded as part of eight infrastructure projects being planned by Xcel Energy.

  • New Mexico sues Texas oil company for lease payments

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico State Land Office is suing a Texas-based oil company for years of overdue fees and recent environmental cleanup costs at a waste-water injection well used by various oil producers.

  • In this Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, file photo, shoppers stop to look in the window of a lighting store in the Design District of Miami Beach, Fla. The U.S. economy inched forward at the weakest pace in two years from January through March, as consumer spending growth slowed, business investment plunged and exports declined further, according to data released by the Commerce Department, Thursday, April 28, 2016. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

    US economy struggles at start of election year

    WASHINGTON (AP) — It was not a great start for the U.S. economy.

  • In this Feb. 10, 2016, file photo, members of a media tour group wearing a protective suit and a mask walk together after they receive a briefing from Tokyo Electric Power Co. employees (in blue) in front of storage tanks for radioactive water at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan. In an AP interview, a chief architect of an “ice wall” being built into the ground around the broken Fukushima nuclear plant defends the project but acknowledges it won’t be watertight, and as much as 50 tons of radiated water will still accumulate each day. TEPCO, the utility that operates the facility, resorted to the $312 million frozen barrier after it became clear that something had to be done to stem the flow of water into and out of the broken reactors so that they can be dismantled. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP, File)

    AP Interview: Fukushima plant’s new ice wall not watertight

    TOKYO (AP) — Coping with the vast amounts of ground water flowing into the broken Fukushima nuclear plant — which then becomes radiated and seeps back out — has become such a problem that Japan is building a 35 billion yen ($312 million) “ice wall” into the earth around it.

  • In this Tuesday, April 26, 2016 photo, an elephant opens its mouth while being sprayed water to cool off at Dusit Zoo in Bangkok, Thailand. Authorities are telling people to stay out of the blazing sun to avoid heat stroke. April in Thailand is typically hot and sweaty but his year's scorching weather has set a record for the longest heat wave in at least 65 years. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

    Thailand is used to hot Aprils, but not this hot!

    BANGKOK (AP) — Animals at Bangkok’s zoo are being fed special frozen fruit pops. People are flocking to shopping malls just to soak up the air-conditioning. Authorities are telling people to stay out of the blazing sun to avoid heat stroke.