• NCAA committee backs proposals to improve athlete experience

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The NCAA Division I Student-Athlete Advisory Committee has endorsed seven proposals to improve an athlete’s college experience.

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • Seton Hall hires Columbia assistant to run tennis program

    SOUTH ORANGE, N.J. (AP) — Former UCLA standout Riza Zalameda has been hired as the head women’s tennis coach at Seton Hall.

  • In this Nov. 22, 2015 FILE photo, Yale's Jack Montague, right, passes the ball around SMU's Markus Kennedy during an NCAA college basketball game in Dallas. Montague's attorney said he was expelled from Yale in Feb. 2016, because of a sexual assault allegation. Montague filed a federal lawsuit over the expulsion, alleging the school mishandled information that originated with someone other than the alleged victim. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez, File)

    Should schools punish in sex cases when there’s no accuser?

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The expulsion of two college athletes on sexual misconduct grounds highlights a little-known facet of the latitude schools are given when investigating such cases: They can mete out punishment even in the absence of a complaint from the alleged victim.

  • New Mexico State Police chief condemns false Facebook page

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — The New Mexico State Police chief is distancing the department from what he says is a false Facebook page created in the agency’s name that bears a swastika as its profile photo.

  • This June 24, 2016, photo, provided by NerdWallet shows Brianna McGurran, a columnist for personal finance website NerdWallet.com. “Ask Brianna” is a Q&A column for 20-somethings, or anyone else starting out. (Jazeena Baeza/NerdWallet via AP)

    Ask Brianna: How should I spend my first full-time paycheck?

    “Ask Brianna” is a Q&A column for 20-somethings, or anyone else starting out. I’m here to help you manage your money, find a job and pay off student loans — all the real-world stuff no one taught us how to do in college. Send your questions about postgrad life to [email protected]

  • In this July 13, 2016 photo, a tiny "origami robot" floats, at right, towards a "wound" in a stomach model at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass. Steven Guitron, a mechanical engineering masters student, and others at MIT have developed these tiny ingestible robots which are "folded up" - hence the name - and swallowed in order to complete certain tasks within the body. So far they can be used to patch wounds, remove foreign objects, and even deliver medicine within the body. The robots unfold when ingested, and can be controlled by magnet forces outside of the body. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Having stomach troubles? Try swallowing an origami robot

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Has your child swallowed a small battery? In the future, a tiny robot made from pig gut could capture it and expel it.

  • In this July 15, 2016 photo, caipirinha vendor Wanderlei Silva Santos explains how he communicates to foreign tourists his prices in the sand on Copacabana beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Santos, who sells Brazil's national cocktail, says he struggles to communicate with foreign tourists who stop at his stand on Copacabana Beach, so he uses his fingers and toes to write prices and shapes in the sand. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Visiting Rio for the Olympics? Get your Portuguese ready

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — If English is the language of world commerce, Brazil hasn’t gotten the memo — only a small fraction of its 200 million people have a basic proficiency. Fluency is also rare for other languages such as German, French and even Spanish, despite Brazil being bordered by seven Spanish-speaking countries.

  • In this Sept. 24, 2013 file photo, Turkish Islamic preacher Fethullah Gulen is pictured at his residence in Saylorsburg, Pa. A lawyer for the Turkish government, Robert Amsterdam, said that "there are indications of direct involvement" in the Friday, July 15, 2016, coup attempt of Fethullah Gulen, a Muslim cleric who is living in exile in Pennsylvania. He said he and his firm "have attempted repeatedly to warn the U.S. government of the threat posed" by Gulen and his movement. (AP Photo/Selahattin Sevi, File)

    AP EXPLAINS: The cleric being blamed for Turkey coup attempt

    In a story July 15 about a Muslim cleric accused of being behind a coup attempt in Turkey, The Associated Press misspelled the Turkish president’s first name. He is Recep Tayyip Erdogan, not Recip Tayyip Erdogan.