• A man walk past a bank electronic board showing the Hong Kong share index at Hong Kong Stock Exchange Thursday, Feb. 11, 2015. Hong Kong's stocks are set for their biggest daily drop in six months on Thursday, as worries about the health of the global economy, particularly the mainland, sparked a sell-off in financials and energy shares, according to government radio. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu)

    Questions grow over banks as profit warnings pile up

    PARIS (AP) — Questions are growing over the financial health of banks, particularly in Europe, as they face a toxic mix of low economic growth, bad loans and squeezed earnings.

  • A South Korean vehicle returning home from North Korea's Kaesong arrives as customs officers talk with a driver at the customs, immigration and quarantine office near the border village of Panmunjom, in Paju, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. South Korean workers on Thursday began shutting down a jointly run industrial park in North Korea, a move that will end, at least temporarily, the Koreas' last major cooperation project as punishment over Pyongyang's recent rocket launch. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    10 Things to Know for Today

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

  • An employee passes next to an index board at the reception hall of the Stock Exchange in Athens, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Banks, particularly in Europe, have come under pressure over recent days as investors fret about their ability to cope with a bigger than expected global slowdown at a time when many still have sizeable bad loans on their books. Greece is expected to slip back into a mild recession in 2016, while the global sell-off in financial markets saw the value of shares on the Athens Stock Exchange sink to their worst level since 1989. (AP Photo/Thanassis Stavrakis)

    The Latest: European stocks sink, tracking Asia lower

    LONDON (AP) — The latest on the turmoil afflicting global financial markets (all times local):

  • Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by a sharp drop in Hong Kong as it caught up with global market turmoil after Lunar New Year holidays. An escalation in tensions between North and South Korea added to a litany of woes for markets that were already flustered by signs of slowing global growth and the slide in oil prices.

  • Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.

  • A man looks at screens displaying financial information at the Stock Exchange in Madrid, Spain, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Renewed jitters about the global economy set off a wave of selling in banking stocks after Asian markets tumbled Tuesday, led by a 5.4 percent slide in Tokyo. The stock index in Spain was off roughly 4 percent, while Italy's lost about 5 percent and Greece's index sank about 8 percent. Stock markets have been slump so far this year after a lackluster 2015. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

    Eurozone concerns building again after period of calm

    LONDON (AP) — Slowly but surely, worries over the 19-country eurozone are building again.

  • A man looks at an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 in Tokyo, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. Asian stock markets fell for a third consecutive day Wednesday, beset by nerves about shaky global growth, falling oil prices and possible capital shortfalls at major European banks. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Global stocks turn higher ahead of Yellen testimony

    LONDON (AP) — European stocks rose Wednesday and Wall Street was expected to open higher ahead of testimony from the Federal Reserve chief that could either ease market turmoil or add to it. Asian markets mostly fell in a spillover sell-off from the previous day’s losses.

  • A man scratches his head as he looks at an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 in Yokohama, near Tokyo, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. Asian stock markets fell for a third consecutive day Wednesday, beset by nerves about shaky global growth, falling oil prices and possible capital shortfalls at major European banks. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    The Latest: European markets solid as focus turns to Fed

    LONDON (AP) — The latest on the turmoil global financial markets (all times local):

  • This combination of file photos shows logos for IBM, Macy's, Chevron and Starwood Hotels and Resorts group's W Hotel Hollywood. Big companies have lost billions buying their own shares. Nearly half the companies in the Standard and Poor’s 500 index paid more for their shares in the past three years than they are worth, according to analysis by The Associated Press. Retailer Macy’s is down $1.4 billion on its purchases, a 24 percent loss. As the price of oil plunged, driller Chevron lost $3.3 billion betting on its stock, a 33 percent loss. Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide has lost hundreds of millions on buybacks, more than a fifth of what it spent. IBM has the biggest losses from buybacks, down $5.5 billion. (AP Photo)

    Companies lose billions buying back their own stock

    NEW YORK (AP) — If you think your stocks are doing poorly, check out the performance of some of the most sophisticated investors, the ones with more knowledge about what’s going on inside businesses than anyone else: Companies that buy their own shares.

  • Money traders work in front of the computer terminal at a foreign exchange brokerage in Tokyo, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Asian markets tumbled Tuesday as renewed jitters about the global economy set off a wave of selling in banking stocks. The dollar fell to 114.90 yen from 115.58 yen. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Japanese stock slide leads global markets lower

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks are opening modestly lower in the U.S., led by declines in energy companies and banks.