• A Friday, Aug. 5, 2016 photo shows land in West Jordan, Utah, that may be purchased by FaceBook for a data center. The race between the small town of Los Lunas in New Mexico and the Salt Lake City suburb of West Jordan to entice a new Facebook data center with millions in tax breaks and subsidies is raising questions about public investments in a booming cloud-computing economy that typically brings few local jobs. (Scott G Winterton/Deseret News via AP)

    Race for Facebook data center raises tax-break questions

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The race between a small town on the Rio Grande in New Mexico and a Salt Lake City suburb to entice a new Facebook data center with millions of dollars in tax breaks and subsidies is raising questions about public investments in a booming cloud-computing economy that typically brings few local jobs.

  • A man walks past an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 index at a securities firm in Tokyo, Tuesday, Aug. 30, 2016. Asian shares were mostly higher Tuesday as hopes continued for a U.S. Federal Reserve interest rate cut later this year. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Stocks open moderately higher on Wall Street

    TOKYO (AP) — Asian shares were mostly higher Tuesday as hopes continued for a U.S. Federal Reserve interest rate cut later this year.

    Updated: 8:41 pm

  • Brazil's suspended President Dilma Rousseff speaks at her own impeachment trial, in Brasilia, Brazil, Monday, Aug. 29, 2016. Rousseff reminded senators that she was re-elected in 2014 by 54 million voters. She says that at every moment she has followed the constitution and done what was best for the country. (AP Photo/Eraldo Peres)

    Brazil’s Rousseff to address Senate in trial over her future

    BRASILIA, Brazil (AP) — In a session less electric than expected, Brazil’s suspended president proclaimed her innocence at her impeachment trial Monday, branding her vice president a “usurper,” calling the drive to oust her a “coup” and warning senators that history will judge them harshly if they oust a democratically elected leader on false charges.

    Updated: 8:14 pm

  • In this May 2, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to Dr. Christopher Beckett, CEO of Williamson Health and Wellness Center during a tour an exam room of the facility in Williamson, W.Va. With the hourglass running out for his administration, President Barack Obama’s health care law is struggling in many parts of the country. Double-digit premium increases and exits by big-name insurers have caused some to wonder whether “Obamacare” will go down as a failed experiment. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Can Clinton save health overhaul from its mounting problems?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — With the hourglass running out for his administration, President Barack Obama’s health care law is struggling in many parts of the country. Double-digit premium increases and exits by big-name insurers have caused some to wonder whether “Obamacare” will go down as a failed experiment.

  • In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, the Port of Los Angeles, with some cargo loading cranes in the upright and idle position, are seen in this view from the San Pedro area of Los Angeles. In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade, or hostile to it. The backlash threatens a pillar of U.S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade. Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U.S. more efficient. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:

  • An honor guard stands vigil over Bolivia's Deputy Minister of Internal Affairs Rodolfo Illanes lying in state, inside the government palace in La Paz, Bolivia Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. Striking Bolivian miners kidnapped and beat to death Illanes Thursday, in a shocking spasm of violence following weeks of tension over dwindling paychecks in a region hit hard by falling metal prices. The miners were demanding they be allowed to work for private companies, who promise to put more cash in their pockets. (AP Photo/Juan Karita)

    Striking miners kidnap, kill deputy minister in Bolivia

    LA PAZ, Bolivia (AP) — President Evo Morales and his political opponents traded recriminations Friday over the shocking beating death of a high-ranking government official by protesting miners who had blockaded a highway.

  • Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, center, strolls with Stanley Fischer, right, vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and Bill Dudley, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, before her speech to the annual invitation-only conference of central bankers from around the world, at Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, north of Jackson Hole, Wyo., Friday, Aug 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Yellen suggests rate hike is coming but offers no timetable

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the case for raising interest rates has strengthened in light of a solid job market and an improved outlook for the U.S. economy and inflation. But she stopped short of offering any timetable.

  • This Thursday, Oct. 2, 2014, file photo, shows a Wall Street sign adjacent to the New York Stock Exchange. Stocks rose in early trading Friday, Aug. 26, 2016, following two days of declines after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen gave an upbeat assessment on the U.S. economy. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    Stocks rising in early trading following 2 days of declines

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks ended mostly lower on Friday after Federal Reserve officials said the case has strengthened for raising interest rates above the super-low levels that have helped fuel a seven-year bull market.

  • In this Wednesday, May 18, 2016, photo, Joe Russo, of Medway, Mass., puts a bag of potting soil into a cart while shopping at a Home Depot store location, in Bellingham, Mass. The U.S. economy expanded at a sluggish pace this spring as businesses sharply reduced their stockpiles of goods and spent less on new buildings and equipment, according to information released by the Commerce Department, Friday, Aug. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

    US economy grew at tepid 1.1 percent pace in spring

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy expanded at a sluggish 1.1 percent pace this spring as businesses sharply reduced their stockpiles of goods and spent less on new buildings and equipment. Yet most analysts forecast much faster growth in the summer and fall, fueled by healthy consumer spending.

  • The most contrarian move in investing: Trust a stock picker

    NEW YORK (AP) — It’s perhaps the most contrarian move in investing today: Trust a stock picker.