• In this May 2, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton listens to Dr. Christopher Beckett, CEO of Williamson Health and Wellness Center during a tour an exam room of the facility in Williamson, W.Va. With the hourglass running out for his administration, President Barack Obama’s health care law is struggling in many parts of the country. Double-digit premium increases and exits by big-name insurers have caused some to wonder whether “Obamacare” will go down as a failed experiment. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

    Can Clinton save health overhaul from its mounting problems?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — With the hourglass running out for his administration, President Barack Obama’s health care law is struggling in many parts of the country. Double-digit premium increases and exits by big-name insurers have caused some to wonder whether “Obamacare” will go down as a failed experiment.

    Updated: 8:27 am

  • In this Feb. 12, 2015 file photo, the Port of Los Angeles, with some cargo loading cranes in the upright and idle position, are seen in this view from the San Pedro area of Los Angeles. In this angry election year, many American voters are skeptical about free trade, or hostile to it. The backlash threatens a pillar of U.S. policy: The United States has long sought global trade. Economists say imports cut prices for consumers and make the U.S. more efficient. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:

  • Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen, center, strolls with Stanley Fischer, right, vice chairman of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, and Bill Dudley, the president of the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, before her speech to the annual invitation-only conference of central bankers from around the world, at Jackson Lake Lodge in Grand Teton National Park, north of Jackson Hole, Wyo., Friday, Aug 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

    Yellen suggests rate hike is coming but offers no timetable

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said Friday that the case for raising interest rates has strengthened in light of a solid job market and an improved outlook for the U.S. economy and inflation. But she stopped short of offering any timetable.

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks to supporters at a rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa, Fla., Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. (Loren Elliott/The Tampa Bay Times via AP)

    WHY IT MATTERS: Trade

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: In this angry election year, many American voters are deeply skeptical about free trade — or downright hostile to it.

  • In this Thursday, July 21, 2016, file photo, European Central Bank President Mario Draghi speaks during a news conference in Frankfurt, Germany, after a meeting of the governing council. The Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of Japan have pumped trillions of dollars into global financial markets and taken the radical step of pushing interest rates below zero in Europe and Japan. But the results have been lackluster. (AP Photo/Michael Probst, File)

    Bold moves, tepid gains: Have central banks met their limit?

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The world’s key central banks have worked themselves into contortions to try to rev up economic growth, raise inflation and coax consumers and businesses to borrow and spend more.

  • In this Friday, Nov. 13, 2015, file photo, the American flag flies above the Wall Street entrance to the New York Stock Exchange. Stocks were moving mostly lower in early trading Monday, Aug. 22, 2016, as investors looked ahead to the Fed’s meeting in Jackson Hole, Wyo., for clues on timing for possible interest rate hikes. A drop in oil prices pulled energy companies lower, along with the broader market. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    Stocks fall in early trading as oil prices decline

    HONG KONG (AP) — Most stock markets in Asia moved sideways on Tuesday as the summer doldrums and a lack of economic data ahead of a widely anticipated speech by the Fed chief kept investors on the sidelines.

  • This undated photo provided by Institute of International Finance shows Charles Collyns. Collyns is the chief economist at the Institute of International Finance. Collyns spoke to The Associated Press about China's currency weakness and the strength of the country's economy. (Institute of International Finance via AP)

    Q&A: Former Treasury official Collyns on China’s currency

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A year ago, the People’s Bank of China jolted financial markets by devaluing the Chinese currency. Investors were rattled again when China’s yuan — also called the renminbi, or RMB — dropped last fall. They worried that China’s economy was weaker than anyone thought and that Beijing was driving down the currency to make the country’s exports more affordable overseas.

  • In this Aug. 12, 2016 file photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump gives a thumbs up as he leaves a campaign rally in Altoona, Pa. While Donald Trump's chief economic pitch is decrying foreign trade, the audience for his argument is shrinking by the day in the state most pivotal to his shot at the presidency. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

    In North Carolina, audience shrinking for Trump’s message

    ASHEVILLE, N.C. (AP) — Hillary Clinton “owes the state of North Carolina a very big apology,” Donald Trump thundered, condemning the loss of manufacturing jobs due to free-trade deals supported by the Democratic presidential nominee.