• President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands after speaking to media in Shima, Japan, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama to wrap up trip to Vietnam by talking to young leaders

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — Laying bare the complex politics of reconciliation and contrition, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday rejected the idea of visiting Pearl Harbor to reciprocate for President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Hiroshima later this week. Obama, for his part, said he would use his time in Hiroshima to honor all those killed in World War II and to push for a world without nuclear weapons.

  • In this Jan. 18, 2016 file photo, Wang Jianlin, chairman of Wanda Group, delivers a speech at the Ninth Asian Financial Forum in Hong Kong. Wanda Group and its billionaire founder, Wang Jianlin, are inaugurating a sprawling entertainment complex Saturday, May 28 in China's southeast three weeks before the June 16 opening of Disney's first mainland Chinese park in Shanghai. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

    China’s Wanda prepares for battle with ‘old brand’ Disney

    BEIJING (AP) — Mickey Mouse has a new and deep-pocketed challenger: China’s shopping mall king.

  • In this May 24, 2016 file photo, a man puts a banner of the G7 Summit at International Media Center in Ise, Mie Prefecture, central Japan. Leaders of the Group of Seven rich nations will undoubtedly voice unity over fighting terrorism, pandemics and tax evasion at their summit in Japan starting on Thursday, May 26. Finding a consensus on how to breathe life into their sluggish economies is proving more elusive. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    Group of 7 seeks way forward for aging, faltering economies

    ISE, Japan (AP) — Leaders of the Group of Seven rich nations plan to voice unity over fighting terrorism, pandemics and tax evasion at their summit in Japan this week. Finding a consensus on how to breathe life into their sluggish economies is proving more elusive.

  • Trader Gregory Rowe, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Stocks are opening solidly higher on Wall Street, led by gains in technology stocks and banks. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    US stocks jump as rising interest rates help banks higher

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stock markets rallied Wednesday as solid U.S. housing sales data and overnight gains on Wall Street raised expectations for a strong recovery in the world’s largest economy.

  • Russia's Sports Minister Vilaty Mutko gestures as he answers a journalist's questions, after their press tour of its anti doping laboratory in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The Russians have been accused of state-sponsored doping at the 2014 Sochi Olympics, and the IOC has asked WADA to carry out a full-fledged investigation and plans to retest Sochi samples. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko)

    Coach: High jump champ Chicherova notified of doping retest

    MOSCOW (AP) — Ten medalists from the 2008 Beijing Olympics, including 2012 high jump champion Anna Chicherova, were among 14 Russians that tested positive in the reanalysis of their doping samples, state television reported Tuesday.

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.

  • In this Feb. 18, 2016 file photo, North Korean performers entertain customers at the Okryugwan restaurant in Beijing, China. An unspecified number of North Koreans working at an unidentified Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The announcement by Seoul's Unification Ministry came after South Korean media reported that two or three female employees at an unspecified North Korean-run restaurant in China fled and went to an unidentified Southeast Asian country earlier this month. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan. File)

    South Korea: Overseas North Korean restaurant workers flee

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — An unspecified number of North Koreans working at a Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday.

  • In this Saturday, May 21, 2016 photo, women wearing raincoats dance in unison on the Bund in Shanghai. According to the Guinness World Records website, 31,697 participants in Beijing, Shanghai and four other cities set a new world record on Saturday for mass plaza dancing in multiple locations by performing choreographed dance moves together for more than five minutes. (Chinatopix via AP) CHINA OUT

    In sync: Over 31,000 in China set world dance record

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s dancing grannies have taken their moves to the record books.

  • In this Feb. 18, 2016 file photo, North Korean performers entertain customers at the Okryugwan restaurant in Beijing, China. An unspecified number of North Koreans working at an unidentified Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday, May 24, 2016. The announcement by Seoul's Unification Ministry came after South Korean media reported that two or three female employees at an unspecified North Korean-run restaurant in China fled and went to an unidentified Southeast Asian country earlier this month. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan. File)

    Seoul: Overseas N. Korean restaurant workers flee

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — An unspecified number of North Koreans working at a Pyongyang-run restaurant overseas have escaped their workplace and will come to South Korea, South Korean officials said Tuesday.

  • Vietnam veterans Robert Turner, 68, left, and Cliff Stone, 68, both of North Andover, Mass, both of whom said that they oppose President Barack Obama's decision to lift the half-century-old Vietnam arms embargo, pose for a photo at the VFW hall Monday, May 23, 2016, in North Andover, Mass. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)

    Many Vietnam vets say they support lifting of arms embargo

    CHICAGO (AP) — The way Terry Neilen sees it, lifting the ban on U.S. arms sales to Vietnam makes sense in the face of China’s growing influence in the region.