• FOR STORY SLUGGED FRANCE PAUL WATSON - Canadian captain Paul Watson speaks with the Associated-Press in Paris, Tuesday, April 12, 2016.  Founder  of Greenpeace and the controversial Sea Shepherd, anti-whaling activist Watson has a long history of confronting governments, and is on Interpol’s international fugitives list, but now, France has granted him political asylum. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    Sea Shepard founder Paul Watson rams whalers for a living

    PARIS (AP) — He’s a fugitive on Interpol’s Red List and a marine vigilante who’s done jail time for extradition requests. Yet to many, he’s also a heroic marine conservationist who risks his life and those of his crew to save countless endangered whales, turtles, dolphins and sharks from slaughter.

  • Atomic bomb survivor Kimie Miyamoto, 89, speaks during an interview at a retirement home she shares with other bomb victims, in Hiroshima, Japan, Saturday, May 28, 2016. A-bomb survivors feel both wonder and doubt after U.S. President Barack Obama visited the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on Friday. "The world paid attention to what happened here, even if just for a while, because someone as important as him came to Hiroshima. So perhaps it could make things a little bit better," Miyamoto said of Obama's visit in an interview. "But you never really know if it will make a difference, because so much depends on what other countries are thinking as well." At right is another bomb survivor Michiko Kimoto, 87. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Atomic bomb survivors feel wonder, doubt after Obama visit

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — The survivors of the world’s first atomic bomb attack are used to hearing grand vows to rid the world of nuclear weapons. They just don’t usually come directly from the leader of the country that dropped the bomb on them in the first place.

  • Ariya Jutanugarn of Thailand watches her drive from the fifth tee during the second round of the LPGA Volvik Championship golf tournament at the Travis Pointe Country Club, Friday, May 27, 2016, in Ann Arbor, Mich. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

    Hat trick? Ariya Jutanugarn shoots 68 to take 2-shot lead

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Ariya Jutanugarn tore her scorecard into pieces after walking off the 18th green at Travis Pointe, proving the competition isn’t the only thing she is tearing up.

  • Text of Obama’s speech at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park

    Text of President Barack Obama’s remarks Friday at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park about the U.S. atomic bombing, the legacy of World War II and nuclear weapons, as delivered:

  • This Oct. 4, 2014, file photo, shows the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. Stock markets around the world edged higher Thursday, May 26, 2016, as traders interpreted the rise in oil prices to $50 a barrel for the first time this year as a positive sign for the global economy. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    US stocks edge higher, led by consumer companies and banks

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks rose Friday to wrap up their strongest week in almost three months. Banks gained ground after Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said the central bank intends to keep raising interest rates provided the economy continues to improve.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama hugs Shigeaki Mori, an atomic bomb survivor; creator of the memorial for American WWII POWs killed at Hiroshima, during a ceremony at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016. Obama on Friday became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site of the world's first atomic bomb attack, bringing global attention both to survivors and to his unfulfilled vision of a world without nuclear weapons. (AP Photo Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama’s hug of Hiroshima survivor epitomizes historic visit

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — President Barack Obama may have faced the legacy of Hiroshima most directly with his embrace of a man who survived the devastating atomic blast.

  • Nine-time champion Rafael Nadal announces he is pulling out of the French Open because of an injury to his left wrist during a press conference at the Roland Garros stadium in Paris, France, Friday May 27, 2016. The left-handed Nadal made the announcement at a hastily arranged news conference Friday, one day before he would have been scheduled to play his third-round match. (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

    Simona Halep in trouble at French Open against Osaka

    PARIS (AP) — For a decade, Rafael Nadal ruled Roland Garros the way no other man has dominated any Grand Slam site.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama hugs Shigeaki Mori, an atomic bomb survivor; creator of the memorial for American WWII POWs killed at Hiroshima, during a ceremony at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016. Obama on Friday became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site of the world's first atomic bomb attack, bringing global attention both to survivors and to his unfulfilled vision of a world without nuclear weapons. (AP Photo Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama at Hiroshima: ‘Death fell from the sky’

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — With an unflinching look back at a painful history, President Barack Obama stood on the hallowed ground of Hiroshima on Friday and declared it a fitting place to summon people everywhere to embrace the vision of a world without nuclear weapons.

  • Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe leaves after a press conference of the Group of Seven Summit in Shima, central Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016. The G-7 host, Abe appealed to his fellow leaders to act to avert another global crisis, comparing the current global economic situation to conditions just before the 2008 financial crisis. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    G7 leaders pledge action on terrorism, refugees, slow growth

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe claimed success Friday in winning support for his approach to fighting off a possible economic crisis from fellow leaders of the Group of Seven wealthy nations, despite mounting evidence the formula is failing to yield promised results in Japan.

  • In this Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014 photo, a worker arranges engine blocks at the General Motors assembly plant in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province. General Motors Co.'s main Chinese joint venture is recalling 2.2 million cars to deal with insufficient corrosion resistance on crankcase valves. The recall was ordered after Shanghai-GM received complaints about engine damage, according to the country's product quality regulator. The automaker is a joint venture between GM and state-owned Shanghai Automotive Industries Corp. (Chinatopix via AP) CHINA OUT

    GM recalls 2.2 million cars in China

    BEIJING (AP) — General Motors Co.’s main Chinese joint venture is recalling 2.2 million cars to deal with insufficient corrosion resistance on crankcase valves.