• Brazil's Health Minister Marcelo Castro speaks to the press before attending the Mercosur Health Ministers summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate actions to try and fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. Castro said that efforts are being made to create a vaccine against it. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    APNewsbreak: Few Zika samples being shared by Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — U.N. and U.S. health officials tell The Associated Press that Brazil has yet to share enough samples and disease data needed to answer the most worrying question about the Zika outbreak: whether the virus is actually responsible for the increase in the number of babies born with abnormally small heads in Brazil.

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 photo, safety pamphlets written in both English and Spanish are displayed during a pesticide safety training class for farm supervisors in Sebring, Fla. Millions of farm workers do jobs with a high risk of exposure to toxic chemicals every day, yet a federal system of protections meant to improve safety and provide an avenue for reporting exposure is ineffective and riddled with problems, according to an Associated Press review of federal and state enforcement data and case records. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    BELLE GLADE, Fla. (AP) — Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings.

  • In this Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015 photo, safety pamphlets written in both English and Spanish are displayed during a pesticide safety training class for farm supervisors in Sebring, Fla. Millions of farm workers do jobs with a high risk of exposure to toxic chemicals every day, yet a federal system of protections meant to improve safety and provide an avenue for reporting exposure is ineffective and riddled with problems, according to an Associated Press review of federal and state enforcement data and case records. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

    Review reveals problems protecting workers from pesticides

    BELLE GLADE, Fla. (AP) — Dozens of farmworkers looked up at the little yellow plane buzzing over the Florida radish field, a mist of pesticide falling from its wings.

  • In this Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a Wall Street street sign is framed by a giant American flag hanging on the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. Global stock markets were having another lackluster day Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, amid ongoing worries over the state of the world economy, which has piled the pressure on oil prices in particular. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    US stocks give up an early gain and move lower; Yahoo down

    HONG KONG (AP) — Most Asian stocks jumped Thursday as oil prices bounced back and weak U.S. economic data fueled investor hopes that the Fed would slow the pace of rate hikes this year. Japanese shares fell as the yen rose against the dollar.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus seems to operate like a heat-driven missile of disease. Scientists say the hotter it gets, the better the mosquito that carries Zika virus is at transmitting a variety of dangerous illnesses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Sexually-transmitted Zika case confirmed in Texas

    DALLAS (AP) — Health officials on Tuesday reported that a person in Texas has become infected with the Zika virus through sex in the first case of the illness being transmitted within the United States amid the current outbreak in Latin America.

  • ESPN reporter Holly Rowe undergoing surgery to remove tumor

    BRISTOL, Conn. (AP) — ESPN reporter Holly Rowe says she is undergoing surgery to remove a tumor.

  • A Sucre municipality worker fumigates for Aedes aegypti mosquitoes that transmit the Zika virus in the Petare neighborhood of Caracas, Venezuela, Monday, Feb. 1, 2016. Venezuela is reporting a jump in cases of a rare, sometimes paralyzing syndrome that may be linked to the Zika virus. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)

    The Latest: Female airline crew can request no Brazil flight

    PARIS (AP) — The Latest on the battle against the Zika virus (all times local):

  • Mario Andrada, spokesperson for the Rio Olympic Organizing Committee, speaks next to a screen that reads in Portuguese : "Message about Zika" during a media briefing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016. Reporters came to hear about ticket sales, venue construction and a reminder that Friday marks six months until the games open. Instead, they got the organizers' medical director Dr. Joao Grangeiro and government health officials assuring the games will be safe; that only pregnant women are in danger from a virus with its epicenter in Brazil. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Zika virus overshadows buildup to Rio de Janeiro Olympics

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Zika virus is overshadowing the final preparations for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics, even eclipsing concerns over deep budget cuts and severe water pollution.

  • In this Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015, file photo, Atlanta Braves starter Mike Foltynewicz throws against the Chicago Cubs during the first inning of a baseball game, in Chicago. After life-threatening blood clots in his right shoulder ended his 2015 season, Braves right-handed pitcher Foltynewicz is slowly regaining his strength and hoping to be ready to contend for a rotation spot. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh, File)

    Braves’ Foltynewicz continues recovery from blood clots

    ATLANTA (AP) — Braves right-hander Mike Foltynewicz said Monday he hopes to be cleared this week to throw off a mound as he continues his recovery from life-threatening blood clots in his right shoulder.

  • Arizona officials say horse tested positive for virus

    PHOENIX (AP) — A horse that had to be euthanized last week at Turf Paradise racetrack as a result of a herpes outbreak tested positive for the virus, officials with the Arizona Department of Agriculture confirmed Monday.