• This June 8, 2012 file photo shows soul singer Sharon Jones of Sharon Jones and The Dap-Kings performing during the Bonnaroo Music and Arts Festival in Manchester, Tenn. Jones is the focus of a new documentary, "Miss Sharon Jones!" that captures the stark difference between life on and off stage for the dynamic soul singer most often compared to James Brown. In 2013, Jones was diagnosed with stage-two pancreatic cancer. The film documents her transformation into cancer patient and, ultimately, back into a full-throated force. (AP Photo/Dave Martin, File)

    The show goes on for cancer-stricken Sharon Jones

    NEW YORK (AP) — Preparing to go on stage for the first time in months after intensive rounds of chemotherapy, an atypically nervous Sharon Jones sat backstage at New York’s Beacon Theatre, clutching a cup and shaking.

  • Mariners SS Marte has mono, is headed for disabled

    TORONTO (AP) — Seattle Mariners shortstop Ketel Marte has been diagnosed with mononucleosis and is expected to be placed on the 15-day disabled list.

  • In this image released by Open Road Films, former New Orleans Saints safety Steve Gleason, left, appears with his son Rivers, right, and wife Michel in a scene from the documentary "Gleason." The film follows Gleason and his wife, Michel, into the maelstrom of ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, as the couple adjusts to their fluctuating reality and makes way for their son, Rivers. (Open Road Films via AP)

    In ‘Gleason,’ a football star with ALS finds a new purpose

    NEW YORK (AP) — In the opening moments of the documentary “Gleason,” the celebrated New Orleans Saints safety Steve Gleason talks to the camera with a not-yet-occupied crib behind him. He has just learned that he has ALS. Soon the symptoms will take over. Preparing for what’s coming, Gleason tells his unborn son that he wants to give him “as much of myself as I possibly can while I still can.”

  • Zika carrier mosquito found in 4 New Mexico counties

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A species of mosquito that is capable of transmitting the Zika virus has been found in a fourth New Mexico county.

  • A member of the Salt Lake City Mosquito Abatement District handles a fish that eats mosquito larvae on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in Salt Lake City. The fish will be placed ponds and other standing water in places like abandoned pools. Mosquito abatement teams in Salt Lake City are stepping up efforts to trap and test mosquitoes and kill larvae following the discovery of a unique Zika case that has health investigators trying to figure how the man got the virus. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

    Mosquito control officials: Even Zika suspicions are costly

    MIAMI (AP) — Florida mosquito control officials worry they won’t be able to keep up their efforts to contain the bugs that carry Zika without federal funding, even as concern mounts that the first mosquito-borne case in the U.S. is near.

  • Nadja Mayerle with the Salt Lake City Mosquito Abatement District looks at a mosquito Tuesday, July 19, 2016, in Salt Lake City. Health authorities in Utah are investigating a unique case of Zika found in a person who had been caring for a relative who had an unusually high level of the virus in his blood. Exactly how the disease was transmitted is still a mystery, though the person has since recovered.  (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

    CDC probing possible first Zika case from US mosquito bite

    MIAMI (AP) — Health officials in Florida are investigating whether the Zika infection of a woman in the Miami area could be the first transmission of the virus from a mosquito bite in the continental United States.

  • In this photo provided by Science Translational Medicine, PET scans taken at the Yale PET Center show the density of connections between nerve cells, called synapses, in a healthy living brain. Yale researchers developed a way to picture synapses in a living brain, something that until now has been studied mostly during autopsies. (Science Translational Medicine via AP)

    New technique opens window into how brain cells communicate

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The brain’s nerve cells communicate by firing messages to each other through junctions called synapses, and problems with those connections are linked to disorders like Alzheimer’s and epilepsy. Now Yale University researchers have developed a way to picture synapses in living brains.

  • Albuquerque-area man is New Mexico’s 2nd plague case in 2016

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — State health officials say New Mexico has a second confirmed human case of plague this year.

  • Panel: ‘Abuse’ was cause of autistic student’s broken legs

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — An outside panel has concluded that physical abuse was the cause of injuries to an autistic teenager whose legs were broken when a teaching assistant physically restrained him.