• In this April 1, 2016 photo, a worker swipe the "Beijing Connect" old person's card for a customer at a steamed bread store in a supermarket in Beijing. When people over 80 in Beijing take a bus, see a doctor or spend money, their activities are digitally tracked by the government, as part of an effort to improve services for the country’s rapidly growing elderly population. The data amassed with each swipe of the multi-purpose "Beijing Connect" old person’s card goes into a massive database of the elderly in the capital. City authorities hope the information will enable them to better cope with their burgeoning population of over-60s, which already stands at 3 million. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    Beijing tracks the elderly as they take buses, go shopping

    BEIJING (AP) — These days, when people over 80 in Beijing take a bus, see a doctor or spend money, their activities are digitally tracked by the government, as part of an effort to improve services for the country’s rapidly growing elderly population.

  • In this Jan. 12, 2012, file photo, parent Olivia Samaripa, far right, with her daughter Aria, 2, pull a wagon carrying petitions calling for their school to be converted to a charter school in the Mojave Desert town of Adelanto, Calif. More than 100,000 students in the nation's second-largest school district are now enrolled in charters, draining nearly $592 million from the budget in one school year alone. In Los Angeles, school board members are waging a battle to try and regain the public's trust in district schools. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

    As charters grow, public schools see sharp enrollment drop

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Standing before the Los Angeles Unified School Board, Susan Zoller delivered a startling assessment: More than 100,000 students in the nation’s second-largest district were now enrolled in charters, draining more than $500 million from the budget in a single academic year.

  • In this Sunday, April 24, 2016 photo, Dr. Liu Jiaen, center, watches his staff member work on a laboratory dish during an infertility treatment through in vitro fertilization (IVF) for a patient at a hospital in Beijing. China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue. The rise in IVF points to the deferred dreams of many parents who long wanted a second child, but were prevented by a strict population control policy in place for more than 30 years. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    Finally allowed 2nd child, older Chinese parents turn to IVF

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue.

    Updated: 8:27 pm

  • In this Sunday Feb. 15, 2015 file photo and provided on by the Syrian anti-government activist group Aleppo Media Center (AMC), which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, shows Syrian rebels firing locally made shells against the Syrian government forces, in Aleppo, Syria. Islamic State militants entered a Syrian opposition stronghold in the country's north on Saturday, clashing with rebels on the edges of the town as the extremist group built on its most significant advance near the Turkish border in two years, Syrian opposition groups and IS media said. (AP Photo/Aleppo Media Center, AMC, File)

    Syria rebels under fire from IS militants, government troops

    BEIRUT (AP) — Islamic State militants entered a major Syrian opposition stronghold in the country’s north on Saturday, clashing with rebels on the edges of the town as the extremist group builds on its most significant advance near the Turkish border in two years — even as it loses ground elsewhere in the country and in neighboring Iraq.

  • In this May 11, 2016, photo, Jeremy Wiggins poses for a photo in Columbia, Mo. Wiggins, a 20-year-old business administration major at the University of Missouri-Columbia, is a supporter of Donald Trump and has been elected to be a delegate from Missouri to the Republican National Convention where he plans to cast his delegate vote for Trump. While most polls show Bernie Sanders is the overwhelming favorite of millennials, some young voters are taking a serious look at Trump as the primary season rolls on.  (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

    Dump Trump? Some millennials aren’t so sure

    COSTA MESA, Calif. (AP) — Brendan De Regla drove three hours and waited in line for half a day to see Donald Trump speak at a rally in Southern California.

  • This undated photo provided by General Dynamics shows company CEO Phebe N. Novakovic. Novakovic was one of the highest-paid women CEOs for 2015, as calculated by The Associated Press and Equilar, an executive data firm. (Courtesy of General Dynamics via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Female CEOs see pay rise, but numbers remain small

    For the second year in a row, female CEOs earned more than their male counterparts and received bigger raises. But only a small sliver of the largest companies are run by women, and experts say gender parity at the top remains way off.

  • In this Saturday, May 31, 2014, file photo, members of the graduating class and faculty attend the Savannah College of Art and Design commencement in Atlanta. For the first time on record, living with parents is now the most common arrangement for Americans ages 18 to 34, an analysis of Census data by the Pew Research Center has found. The sharp shift reflects a long-running decline in marriage age, amplified by the economic upheavals of the Great Recession. The trend has been particularly evident among Americans who lack a college degree. (AP Photo/John Amis, File)

    Goodbye, empty nest: Millennials staying longer with parents

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Many of America’s young adults appear to be in no hurry to move out of their old bedrooms.