• People attend Friday prayers in Fatih mosque, Istanbul, Friday July 22, 2016. Turkish lawmakers responded to an attempted coup by approving a three-month state of emergency that allows the government to extend detention times and issue decrees. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkish city streets are calm after emergency declaration

    ISTANBUL (AP) — A top Turkish official on Friday accused the United States of “standing up for savages” by not immediately handing over a U.S.-based Muslim cleric who the government claims orchestrated last week’s failed coup. Speaking in Washington, President Barack Obama said there was a legal process for extradition and encouraged Turkey to present evidence.

  • People walk in Kizilay Square with a poster of Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan in the background in Ankara, Turkey, Thursday, July 21, 2016. Turkish lawmakers declared a three-month state of emergency Thursday, overwhelmingly approving President Recep Tayyip Erdogan's request for sweeping new powers to expand a crackdown in the aftermath of last week's coup. Parliament voted 346-115 to approve the national state of emergency, which will give Erdogan the authority to extend detention times for suspects and issue decrees that have the force of law without parliamentary approval, among other powers.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)

    Analysis: Is Turkish leader transforming a nation?

    ISTANBUL (AP) — The stunning sweep of Turkey’s crackdown following an attempted coup last week forces questions about how far President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will go in a tense, conspiracy-fueled country. While the purges may be designed to derail any future insurrections, there are increasing concerns that Erdogan is seizing the moment to transform Turkey, steering it from its secular roots toward a more pious Muslim model and cementing personal power at the expense of democratic ideals.

  • Supporters of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hold banners and waves their national flags, during a rally at Kizilay main square, in Ankara, Turkey, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry is calling on Turkey to provide hard evidence that a U.S.-based cleric was behind a foiled coup attempt last weekend if it wants him extradited.  (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

    Experts: Restoring death penalty in Turkey would be risky

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Rights groups and legal experts said Wednesday that Turkey would be abandoning international rights conventions, and reverting to relics of military dictatorships if it reinstates the death penalty, which was abolished more than a decade ago.

  • In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 file photo, a Turkish police officer scans the area from a platform, backdropped by posters of Turkish Republic founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and Turkey's current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, during a political rally of AKP, The Justice and Development Party in Istanbul. Turkish lawmakers convened Thursday July 22, 2016 to endorse sweeping new powers for Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)

    Turkish lawmakers set to approve 3-month state of emergency

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey will be able to extend detention times for suspects and issue decrees without parliamentary approval under a three-month state of emergency approved Thursday by lawmakers following last week’s attempted military coup.

  • In this Sunday, May 17, 2015 file photo, a Turkish police officer scans the area from a platform, backdropped by posters of Turkish Republic founder Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, left, and Turkey's current President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, right, during a political rally of AKP, The Justice and Development Party in Istanbul. Turkish lawmakers convened Thursday July 22, 2016 to endorse sweeping new powers for Erdogan that would allow him to expand a crackdown in the wake of July 15 failed coup. The 550-member parliament is set to approve Erdogan's request for a three-month state of emergency. (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis, file)

    The Latest: Turkey detains more judges and military officers

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • A woman takes part in a pro-government rally in Taksim Square, Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    The Latest: Canada urges respect for law in coup aftermath

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the situation in Turkey after the failed military coup last week (all times local):

  • People wave Turkish flags as they gather in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup, Wednesday, July 20, 2016.  Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan declared a 3-month state of emergency after a failed coup. (AP Photo/Petros Giannakouris)

    Turkey widens crackdown after botched coup

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey’s president on Wednesday declared a three-month state of emergency following a botched coup attempt, declaring he would rid the military of the “virus” of subversion and giving the government sweeping powers to expand a crackdown that has already included mass arrests and the closure of hundreds of schools.

  • Pro-government wave Turkish flags as they protest against the attempted coup, in Istanbul, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. T (AP Photo/Lefteris Pitarakis)

    Turkey’s Erdogan recounts night of coup, mulls death penalty

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Asserting that “all the evidence” points to a U.S.-based Muslim cleric as the mastermind of last week’s failed coup, Turkey’s government on Tuesday fired tens of thousands of teachers, university deans and others accused of ties to the plot and demanded the cleric’s extradition.

  • In this Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a Wall Street street sign is framed by an American flag hanging on the facade of the New York Stock Exchange. Global stock markets were higher Monday, July 18, 2016, after Wall Street gains and better Chinese economic data helped to defuse jitters over Turkey's failed coup. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

    Stock indexes drift higher in early trading on Wall Street

    HONG KONG (AP) — Asian stocks were mostly lower Tuesday as investors stuck to a holding pattern as they awaited more corporate earnings and a European Central Bank policy meeting later in the week.

  • A woman waves Turkish flags during a rally against the attempted coup in Taksim Square in Istanbul, protesting against the attempted coup, Monday, July 18, 2016. The Turkish government accelerated its crackdown on alleged plotters of the failed coup against President Recep Tayyip Erdogan. The rebellion, which saw warplanes firing on key government installations and tanks rolling into major cities, was quashed by loyal government forces and masses of civilians who took to the streets. (AP Photo/Emrah Gurel)

    The Latest: Prime minister puts Turkey death toll at 232

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — The Latest on the attempted military coup in Turkey (all times local):