• This undated photo provided by NRD Capital shows NRD Capital founder and interim Frisch’s Restaurants CEO Aziz Hashim. The new lead owner of the Cincinnati-based Frisch’s Restaurants chain wants to flex Big Boy’s brand muscle. Atlanta-based NRD Capital has taken after shareholder approval last week of its $175 million acquisition that ended family operation of the business dating to its first 1939 drive-thru. (Alex Martinez/NRD Capital via AP)

    New boss of Frisch’s Big Boy restaurants plans expansion

    CINCINNATI (AP) — The new leader of the Frisch’s Restaurants chain wants to flex Big Boy’s brand muscle with franchise expansion, new restaurant shapes and sizes, menu and beverage additions, and doing more to court younger customers.

  • In this Aug. 26, 2015 photo, General Mills CEO Ken Powell talks about his company's plans for reducing greenhouse gases during an interview with The Associated Press in Golden Valley, Minn. The company's goal is reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 28 percent by 2025, not just within its own operations but all the way up its supply chain from suppliers. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)

    General Mills sets ambitious goal for greenhouse gas cuts

    GOLDEN VALLEY, Minn. (AP) — General Mills has set an ambitious goal of reducing its greenhouse gas emissions 28 percent by 2025 — not just within its own operations but from farm to fork to landfill.

  • This undated photo provided by Arby's shows Arby’s new lineup of sliders. After years of pushing super-sized portions, fast-food chains are starting to see the perks of going small. (Arby's via AP)

    Fast-food’s new target: The snack attack

    NEW YORK (AP) — Forget the Big Mac attack. Now is the time of the snack attack.

  • Ruling could undermine McDonald’s stance on workers

    NEW YORK (AP) — It could be easier for unions to bargain for better pay and working conditions on behalf of millions of workers at McDonald’s, Burger King and other fast-food chains after a National Labor Relations Board ruling on Thursday.

  • In this Aug. 13, 2015 file photo, a product expert demonstrates the Samsung Galaxy S6 Edge Plus during a presentation at Lincoln Center in New York.  The new Galaxy devices come weeks before comparable updates from Apple are expected. In a sense, if Samsung can’t beat the competition in sales, it can beat it to store shelves. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

    Review: New phones, tablets keep Samsung at Android helm

    NEW YORK (AP) — Samsung’s new smartphones and tablets might not offer enough to entice current iPhone and iPad users to switch, but they keep Samsung at the head of the class among Android gadget makers.

  • Allá bookstore is Santa Fe man’s portal to Latin America

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — One of the nation’s few Spanish-language bookstores hides in plain sight among art galleries, clothing stores and restaurants off the Santa Fe Plaza. Tourists and locals walking along West San Francisco Street can easily miss the second-floor shop where Jim Dunlap holds forth among wooden shelves filled with Latin American literature, history and art books, CDs and tapes of obscure regional folk music, and other items that reflect his interests.

  • This Jan. 14, 2015, file photo, shows the outline of letters that once spelled out "Trump Plaza" on the facade of the former casino in Atlantic City N.J. The federal ban on sports betting in all but four states was upheld Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015, dealing a blow to New Jersey's latest effort to expand gambling options to help its struggling casino and racetrack industries. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    Federal ban on sports betting upheld by appeals panel

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The federal ban on sports betting in all but four states was upheld Tuesday, dealing a blow to New Jersey’s latest effort to expand gambling options to help its struggling casinos and racetracks.

  • In this Monday, July 29, 2013 photo, the Terrafugia "roadable plane" flies during the Experimental Aircraft Association's AirVenture in Oshkosh, Wis.  Terrafugia, a privately backed startup in Woburn, Massachusetts, admits on its website that flying cars have become a pop-culture symbol for dreams that don't come true. CEO Carl Dietrich wants to change that. (Joe Sienkiewicz/The Oshkosh Northwestern via AP) NO SALES; MANDATORY CREDIT

    Tech startups want to change the way you drive

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A veteran computer scientist hates sitting in his car at stop lights, so he creates software that makes the experience less annoying. A former engineering professor wants to double the range of today’s electric vehicles. And an aeronautics expert believes flying cars shouldn’t be science fiction.

  • In this Thursday, June 25, 2015, file photo, Japanese seat belt and air-bag maker Takata Corp. Chairman and CEO Shigehisa Takada gestures during a news conference regarding the expanding recall of his company's air bags in Tokyo. The 2015 American Consumer Satisfaction Index found that satisfaction with automobiles dropped for the third straight year to the lowest level since 2004. Last year automakers recalled a record 64 million vehicles for problems such as exploding air bags, including Takata air bags. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama, File)

    Survey: Recalls make Americans less satisfied with cars

    DETROIT (AP) — Americans are less happy with their cars and trucks than at any time in more than a decade, and it’s largely because they’re getting sick of dealing with recalls.

  • In this July 27, 2015, photo, Giulia Pugliese, 15, right, shops for clothes with friends at Roosevelt Field shopping mall in Garden City, N.Y. Teens are shopping like their parents during the back-to-school season, and that’s putting a lot of pressure on retailers to change the way they market to them. More teens are thrifty nowadays, a habit picked up from their recession-scarred parents. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

    Teens are shopping more like their parents

    GARDEN CITY, N.Y. (AP) — Giulia Pugliese is a typical teenager. She likes to look good, and she’s particular about what she wears.