• This product image made available by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) shows the Décor Wood Highchair. The CPSC on Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015 announced it is recalling the product because a child can remove the highchair’s tray, posing a fall hazard. (CPSC via AP)

    Recalls this week: Highchairs, off-highway vehicles

    About 35,000 highchairs are being recalled this week because nearly a dozen children have suffered injuries after removing the tray and falling. Other recalled consumer products include off-highway vehicles with a fuel tank defect.

  • In this Oct. 6, 2015 photo, a foreigner, second from right, walks on a street in Dhaka, Bangladesh. The recent killings of two foreigners in the country - an Italian and a Japanese - has spooked tourists and expatriates in the impoverished South Asian nation, raising alarms about whether Islamic radicals are gaining a foothold and whether foreigners are safe in the moderate, secular nation. (AP Photo/A.M. Ahad)

    Expats spooked after 2 foreigners gunned down in Bangladesh

    DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — The cafes and restaurants are empty. The chatter of guests in hotel lobbies has gone quiet. The high-walled embassy compounds are even more closely guarded.

  • VW may compensate owners of diesel cars for loss of value

    DETROIT (AP) — Volkswagen could compensate owners of diesel-powered cars that emit high levels of pollutants, possibly by paying them for the lost value of their vehicles, the company’s top U.S. executive said Thursday.

  • Volkswagen America CEO Michael Horn adjusts his glasses as he testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Oct. 8, 2015, before the House Oversight and Investigations subcommittee hearing on Volkswagen's emissions cheating allegations. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

    VW’s US CEO to face tough questions in congressional hearing

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Volkswagen’s top U.S. executive offered deep apologies yet sought to distance himself Thursday from the emissions scandal enveloping the world’s largest automaker, asserting top corporate officials had no knowledge of the cheating software installed in 11 million diesel cars.

  • In this July 14, 2015, file photo, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles CEO Sergio Marchionne, left, and United Auto Workers President Dennis Williams gesture during a ceremony to mark the opening of contract negotiations in Detroit. Fiat Chrysler has avoided an expensive strike at its U.S. plants after reaching a tentative labor agreement with the UAW.  UAW announced the agreement just after 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, which was the deadline the union had set to reach a new deal or possibly go on strike. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya, File)

    Fiat Chrysler avoids strike with new tentative contract

    DETROIT (AP) — Fiat Chrysler has avoided an expensive strike at its U.S. plants after reaching a tentative labor agreement with the United Auto Workers union.

  • Massachusetts Lottery exploring fantasy sports options

    BOSTON (AP) — The state’s treasurer says she’s exploring whether the Massachusetts Lottery should enter the lucrative online world of fantasy sports leagues.

  • In this undated file photo released by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants of the Islamic State group hold up their weapons and wave flags as they ride in a convoy, which includes multiple Toyota pickup trucks, through Raqqa city in Syria on a road leading to Iraq. Toyota is working with U.S. officials after questions were raised about the prominent use of its vehicles by militant organizations in Syria, Iraq and Libya. (Militant website via AP, File)

    Why do extremists drive Toyotas?, asks US

    NEW YORK (AP) — Toyota has spoken with U.S. officials about the prominent use of its vehicles by militants in Syria, Iraq and Libya.

  • Judge rules Santa Fe can’t ban sale of small liquor bottles

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A judge has struck down a Santa Fe ordinance that would have banned the sale of small bottles of Alcohol.

  • In this Oct. 5, 2015 photo, Allen Walton, owner of the surveillance equipment company SpyGuy Security, poses for a photo as he conducts online business at a coffee shop in Dallas. As more people receive new chip credit cards designed to thwart thieves, the fraudsters who use cards to steal from stores are expected to switch to e-commerce. Walton realizes SpyGuy could be a target as it grows and online fraud increases. (AP Photo/LM Otero)

    Expect more online fraud as new credit cards arrive

    NEW YORK (AP) — The new chip credit cards that shoppers are getting in their mailboxes may prevent criminals from stealing from stores, but many thieves are expected to move their operations online. Small businesses could be the most vulnerable.

  • Proposed NFL stadium in St. Louis secures naming rights deal

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — The proposed riverfront stadium in St. Louis has a naming rights deal worth $158 million that hinges on the city having an NFL team when the facility opens.