• A June 10, 2015 file photo shows Ashley Madison's Korean web site on a computer screen in Seoul, South Korea. Eight people across the U.S. who registered to use Ashley Madison are suing the cheating website after hackers released personal and detailed information on them and millions of other users, including credit card numbers and sexual preferences. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

    Ashley Madison users in US sue cheating website over breach

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Eight people across the U.S. who registered to use Ashley Madison are suing the website for cheaters after hackers released personal and detailed information of millions of users, including financial data and sexual proclivities.

  • Ashley Madison faces $578M Canadian class-action lawsuit

    TORONTO (AP) — Two Canadian law firms have filed a $578 million class-action lawsuit against the companies that run Ashley Madison after a hacker group’s data breach exposed some 39 million memberships in the adultery website earlier this week.

  • A June 10, 2015 photo from files showing Ashley Madison's Korean web site on a computer screen in Seoul, South Korea. U.S. government employees with sensitive jobs in national security or law enforcement were among hundreds of federal workers found to be using government networks to access and pay membership fees to the cheating website Ashley Madison, The Associated Press has learned.  The list includes at least two assistant U.S. attorneys, an information technology administrator in the White House’s support staff, a Justice Department investigator, a division chief, and a government hacker and counterterrorism employee at the Homeland Security Department. Others visited from networks operated by the Pentagon.   (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

    Experts: Deleted online information never actually goes away

    NEW YORK (AP) — The Ashley Madison hack is a big reminder to all Web users: If you submit private data online, chances are it will never fully be deleted.