• In this photo taken, Aug., 11, 2016, Mickey Munday talks to a reporter in Love Park in North Miami, Fla. When he was one of Miami's notorious "cocaine cowboys" in the 1980s, Mickey Munday made millions of dollars flying loads of drugs for Colombia's Medellin and Cali cartels. He knew infamous Medellin kingpin Pablo Escobar. He liked to fly his illicit cargo to out-of-the-way landing strips in the Everglades using high-tech gadgetry such as night-vision goggles. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

    A Miami ‘cocaine cowboy’ finds redemption with love locks

    NORTH MIAMI, Fla. (AP) — When he was one of Miami’s notorious “cocaine cowboys” in the 1980s, Mickey Munday made millions of dollars flying loads of drugs for Colombia’s Medellin and Cali cartels.

    Updated: 9:11 am

  • In this Aug. 11, 2016 photo, rebels of the 48th Front of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia stand in formation in the southern jungles of Putumayo, Colombia.  With a cease-fire with the Colombian government in place, gone are the days when they had to change camp every few days for fear of being stunned in their sleep by bombs falling from the skies. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    AP EXPLAINS: How Colombia conflict developed over decades

    With Colombia’s government and the country’s biggest rebel movement announcing an agreement on a historic peace deal, The Associated Press explains how the conflict began and developed over the decades.

  • People celebrate in a park as they listen to the announcement from Havana, Cuba, that delegates of Colombia's government and leaders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia reached a peace accord to end their half-century civil war, in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The government's accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia must still be ratified by voters in a plebiscite in order to take effect. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombia’s president rushing plebiscite on deal with rebels

    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Colombia’s president is moving fast to hold a plebiscite on a landmark peace deal reached with leftist rebels, presenting to congress Thursday the full text of the accord that he says will end a half-century of bloody combat.

    Updated: 2:48 am

  • People celebrate  the announcement from Havana, Cuba, that delegates of Colombia's government and leaders of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia reached a peace accord to end their half-century civil war, in Bogota, Colombia, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The government's accord with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia must still be ratified by voters in a plebiscite in order to take effect. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombia, rebels say they have reached historic peace deal

    HAVANA (AP) — Colombia’s government and the country’s biggest rebel group reached a historic deal Wednesday evening for ending a half-century of hostilities in one of the world’s longest-running and bloodiest armed conflicts.

  • In this Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016 photo, Martin Corena, acting commander of the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia’s southern bloc, FARC, addresses his troops in the southern jungles of Putumayo, Colombia. Corena is calling on President Barack Obama to free a guerrilla leader jailed for more than a decade in the U.S. Corena said Ricardo Palmera’s 60-year sentence in connection to the FARC’s holding captive of three American defense contracts was incompatible with Obama’s support for a peace deal. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

    Colombian rebel leader calls on US to free jailed comrade

    JUNGLES OF PUTUMAYO, Colombia (AP) — One of Colombia’s most-grizzled and important rebel fighters is calling on President Barack Obama to do more to support peace and to free a guerrilla leader jailed for more than a decade in the United States.

  • First placed Mariana Pajon of Colombia, right, and second placed Alise Post of the United States, left, celebrate after the women's BMX cycling final during the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, Aug. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

    Pajon defends women’s Olympic BMX gold, Fields wins for US

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The United States ended its gold medal drought in BMX racing after Connor Fields won the men’s Olympic final in the American-born sport on Friday, and Mariana Pajon of Colombia successfully defend her title in the women’s final.