• This NOAA satellite image taken Saturday, May 28, 2016 at 9:45 AM EDT shows Tropical Depression Two continuing to move northwest towards the North and South Carolina coastline as it is expected to slightly strengthen into a weak tropical storm before making landfall. Elsewhere, a weak frontal boundary is draped across northern portions of New England, with thunderstorms beginning to develop across New York and Pennsylvania. A broad amount of cloud cover is also observed over the Midwestern United States with a north-south oriented frontal boundary. (Weather Underground va AP)

    Tropical Storm Bonnie soaks S. Carolina over holiday weekend

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Heavy rains from Tropical Storm Bonnie soaked the coasts of South Carolina, southeastern North Carolina and eastern Georgia, ruining the start of Memorial Day weekend even as it weakened while moving northward.

    Updated: 4:09 am

  • Leo Hernandez talks about the water level in Spring Creek, in the Northwood Pines subdivision, Saturday, May 28, 2016, in Spring, Texas. The water level in the creek rose after this week's torrential rains and is expected to crest sometime in the evening.  (Jon Shapley/Houston Chronicle via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

    3 people still missing after floods in Kansas and Texas

    HOUSTON (AP) — At least three people were still missing on Sunday after torrential rain in Texas and Kansas flooded rivers, washed out roads and left four people dead.

  • Tropical Storm Bonnie ruins long weekend on Carolina beaches

    CHARLESTON, S.C. (AP) — Tropical Storm Bonnie formed Saturday afternoon off the coast of South Carolina as heavy rains from the system ruined the start of the long holiday weekend.

    Updated: 8:18 pm

  • In this Wednesday, May 25, 2016 photo, people sunbathe at the Barceloneta beach in Barcelona, Spain. With sunny days getting longer and lazier, sparkling beaches warming up and terrorism fears driving customers away from other Mediterranean destinations, Spain and Portugal are reaping an economic bonanza from tourism. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

    Tourism boom fires Iberian economies but leaves some cold

    BARCELONA, Spain (AP) — With sunny days getting longer and lazier, sparkling beaches warming up and terrorism fears driving customers away from other Mediterranean destinations, Spain and Portugal are reaping an economic bonanza from tourism.

  • Bret Michaels performs at a free concert on the Seaside Heights, N.J. boardwalk on Friday May 27, 2016, one of many events around the Jersey shore to mark the unofficial start of summer. (AP Photo/Wayne Parry)

    Concert on beach heralds start of summer at Jersey shore

    SEASIDE HEIGHTS, N.J. (AP) — As he belted out the words to “Nothin’ But A Good Time,” Poison singer Bret Michaels gave voice to the plans of residents and revelers alike as the unofficial start of summer arrived at the Jersey shore.

  • FILE- In this Oct.1, 2015 file photo, Craig Fugate, Administrator of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), right, talks about the status of Hurricane Joaquin as it moves through the eastern Bahamas as Rick Knabb, Director of the National Hurricane Center, left, participate in a media briefing at the National Hurricane Center. The U.S. government is set to release its forecast for how many hurricanes and tropical storms are expected to form over Atlantic and Caribbean waters in the next six months. It’s an annual reminder from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration that coastal living comes with significant risks. (AP Photo/Lynne Sladky, File)

    US government set to release hurricane season outlook

    MIAMI (AP) — U.S. government forecasters expect a near-normal Atlantic hurricane season, after three relatively slow years. But they also say climate conditions that influence storm development are making it difficult to predict how many hurricanes and tropical storms will arise over the next six months.

  • DEQ: Anti-pollution work benefits St. Clair River beaches

    MARYSVILLE, Mich. (AP) — Environmental officials say efforts to deal with pollution that for years prompted beach closings along the St. Clair River are paying off.

  • In this May 11, 2016 photo, a taxi drives past the Cuauhtemoc Housing Unit and a municipal sign with a message that reads in Spanish; "Building the new Acapulco" in Acapulco, Mexico. The city's latest wave of killings began April 24, when bursts of gunfire broke out along the coastal boulevard. The murder rate in this city of 800,000 hit 146 per 100,000 inhabitants in 2012. It has since fallen to about 112 per 100,000, but that remains far higher than nationwide levels. (AP Photo/Enric Marti)

    Police, soldiers swarm Mexico’s Acapulco, killings continue

    ACAPULCO, Mexico (AP) — Along with beach towels or sandals, there’s a new popular beach accessory that says a lot about the violence gripping this once-glamorous resort: a small black leather tote hanging from the neck or shoulders of some men. It’s not a man-bag, exactly; it holds a small pistol.

  • Bangladeshi men pull a loaded cart through a waterlogged street after heavy rainfall in Dhaka, Bangladesh, Saturday, May 21, 2016. A cyclone unleashed heavy rain and strong winds on Bangladesh's southern coastal region on Saturday, killing at least 11 people and forcing hundreds of thousands from their homes. Mixing of rain water and toxic waste from industries has turned water into green. (AP Photo/ A.M. Ahad)

    Bangladesh avoids high death toll with cyclone evacuation

    DHAKA, Bangladesh (AP) — Tens of thousands of Bangladeshis returned Monday to wind-battered villages and rain-soaked fields after a strong storm pummeled the coast and killed at least 26 people over the weekend.