• In this Aug. 7, 2015, photo scientist Oliver Grah measures the velocity of a stream of glacier melt stemming from Sholes Glacier in one of Mount Baker's slopes in Mount Baker, Wash. Glaciers on Mount Baker and other mountains in the North Cascades are thinning and retreating. (AP Photo/Manuel Valdes)

    Scientists, tribe study shrinking Washington state glacier

    MOUNT BAKER, Wash. (AP) — Mauri Pelto digs his crampons into the steep icy slope on Mount Baker in Washington state and watches as streams of water cascade off the thick mass of bare, bluish ice. Every 20 yards, the water carves vertical channels in the face of the glacier as it rushes downstream.

  • President Barack Obama greets residents in the the Tremé neighborhood in New Orleans, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015, for the 10th anniversary since the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.  Tremé is one of the oldest black neighborhoods in America, which borders the French Quarter just north of Downtown.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

    Obama says New Orleans is ‘moving forward’ after hurricane

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Visiting residents on tidy porch stoops and sampling the fried chicken at a corner restaurant, President Barack Obama held out the people of New Orleans on Thursday as an extraordinary example of renewal and resilience 10 years after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina.

  • Roofers with Hull Brothers Roofing & Waterproofing resurface townhomes roofs at the Marina del Rey seaside community of Los Angeles on Tuesday, Aug. 25, 2015. While drought-plagued California is eager for rain, the forecast of a potentially Godzilla-like El Nino event has communities clearing out debris basins, urging residents to stock up on emergency supplies and even talking about how a deluge could affect the 50th Super Bowl. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

    Drought-plagued California readies for El Nino storms

    SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — While drought-plagued California is eager for rain, the forecast of a potentially Godzilla-like El Nino event has communities clearing out debris basins, urging residents to stock up on emergency supplies and even talking about how a deluge could affect the 50th Super Bowl.