• Correction: United States-China-Detention story

    WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story July 15 about an American woman detained in China, The Associated Press erroneously reported a U.N. panel’s description of the accusations against her. The panel did not say that she was accused of stealing state secrets, but that the Chinese government told it she was accused of “assisting external parties to steal national intelligence.”

  • In this photo taken on Tuesday, July 19, 2016 and released by Guo Lu, motorists watch people gather to protest outside a KFC restaurant outlet in Baoying county in east China's Jiangsu province. In an apparent attempt to head off large-scale street demonstrations, Chinese state newspapers have criticized scattered protests against KFC restaurants and other U.S. targets sparked by an international tribunal's ruling that denied Beijing's claim to virtually the entire South China Sea. (Guo Lu via AP)

    China criticizes street protests over arbitration ruling

    BEIJING (AP) — In an apparent attempt to head off large-scale street demonstrations, Chinese state newspapers have criticized scattered protests against KFC restaurants and other U.S. targets sparked by an international tribunal’s ruling that denied Beijing’s claim to virtually the entire South China Sea.

  • In  this Tuesday, July 19, 2016 photo, Du Daozheng, editor of the Yanhuang Chunqiu magazine looks on during an interview at his home in Beijing. Du, a 93-year old publisher, a former aide to the ousted Communist Party leader Zhao Ziyang and a stalwart of the party's liberal wing, announced this week the suspension of the magazine, Yanhuang Chunqiu, after government officials ordered a leadership reshuffle and seized its offices and servers. (AP Photo/Gerry Shih)

    Ouster of liberal Chinese magazine publisher marks era’s end

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s best-known liberal journal has endured, by its publisher’s count, 16 major clashes with authorities since its founding in 1991. It has irritated, and outlasted, two Chinese leaders, he says, but it likely won’t survive President Xi Jinping.