• In this May 29, 2014 file photo, Thai soldiers form a line while guarding a bus stop area to prevent an anti-coup demonstration at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand’s military seized power from an elected government on May 22, 2014, with the justification that it wanted to end chaotic and violent political confrontations that had wracked the country for years. But there was more than an attempt to restore stability at play. The coup really was traditional ruling elite’s latest and most decisive intervention in what is now a decade-long war for political power with billionaire telecommunications tycoon-turned-politician Thaksin Shinawatra. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn, File)

    AP Analysis: Why junta rules Thailand, with no end in sight

    BANGKOK (AP) — Thailand’s military seized power from an elected government on May 22, 2014, with the justification that it wanted to end chaotic and violent political confrontations that had wracked the country for years. But more than an attempt to restore stability was at play.

  • New Taiwan's President Tsai Ing-wen, left, and Vice President Chen Chien-jen wave during their inauguration ceremonies in Taipei, Taiwan, Friday, May 20, 2016. Taiwan inaugurated Tsai as its first female president on Friday, returning the pro-independence Democratic Progressive Party to power amid new concerns over increasingly fractious relations with Beijing and a flagging economy. (AP Photo/Chiang Ying-ying)

    New Taiwan president omits one-China principle in speech

    TAIPEI, Taiwan (AP) — Taiwan’s new independence-leaning President Tsai Ing-wen tread carefully around the thorny issue of relations with China in her inaugural address Friday, emphasizing the importance of two decades of growing exchanges without mentioning the one-China principle fundamental to Beijing.