• Currency traders look at the computer monitors near the screens showing the foreign exchange rates at the foreign exchange dealing room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2016. Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.(AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

    Hong Kong, Seoul stocks sharply lower after holidays

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stocks shuddered again Thursday, led by sharp drops in Hong Kong and South Korea, which were catching up to global market turmoil after being shut for Lunar New Year holidays.

    Updated: 9:26 pm

  • A man looks at an electronic stock board showing Japan's Nikkei 225 in Tokyo, Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016. Asian stock markets fell for a third consecutive day Wednesday, beset by nerves about shaky global growth, falling oil prices and possible capital shortfalls at major European banks. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    Global stocks turn higher ahead of Yellen testimony

    LONDON (AP) — European stocks rose Wednesday and Wall Street was expected to open higher ahead of testimony from the Federal Reserve chief that could either ease market turmoil or add to it. Asian markets mostly fell in a spillover sell-off from the previous day’s losses.

  • Smoke rises as protestors set fires on a street in the Mong Kok district of Hong Kong, Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016. Hong Kong’s Lunar New Year celebration descended into chaotic scenes as protesters and police clashed over a street market selling fish balls and other local holiday delicacies. (AP Photo/Kin Cheung)

    Hong Kong student held at airport after violent clashes

    HONG KONG (AP) — A Hong Kong student activist was detained at the city’s airport on Wednesday morning, apparently on suspicion of involvement in a violent Lunar New Year clash between police and protesters, his group said.

  • China reports 1st case of imported Zika virus

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s first case of the Zika virus has been found in a 34-year-old man who recently traveled to Venezuela and is now making a speedy recovery, the government said Wednesday.

  • Dragon and lion dancers perform amidst exploding firecrackers in celebration of the Chinese Lunar New Year Monday, Feb. 8, 2016 at Manila's Chinatown district in Manila, Philippines. This year is Year of the Monkey in the Lunar calendar. (AP Photo/Bullit Marquez)

    Chinese visit temples, fairs to ring in Year of the Monkey

    BEIJING (AP) — Chinese and others around Asia flocked to temples and fairs to pray for good health and fortune on Monday, the first day of the Lunar New Year.

  • People watch a TV news reporting a rocket launch in North Korea, at Seoul Railway Station in Seoul, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. For North Korea's propaganda machine, the long-range rocket launch Sunday carved a glorious trail of "fascinating vapor" through the clear blue sky. For South Korea's president, and other world leaders, it was a banned test of dangerous ballistic missile technology and yet another "intolerable provocation." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    The Latest: S. Korea to begin talks on US missile defense

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Latest on North Korea’s launch of a long-range rocket (all times local):

  • In this Friday, Feb. 5, 2016 photo, workers help their customers pack fireworks at a store ahead of Chinese Lunar New Year in Beijing. Much of China’s population can expect sub-standard sleep after the country starts ringing in the Year of the Monkey. The rat-a-tat snaps of firecrackers, whistling rockets and mortar-like fireworks with possibly enough gunpowder to down a small aircraft will make sure of that. Authorities in Beijing now seem set on the current policy of allowing 24-hour fireworks on New Years Eve and New Years Day and 18-hour windows every day for the following two weeks. But bursts of firework-related mayhem in recent years have prompted officials and media commentators to call for tighter restrictions. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    New Year’s fireworks a little quieter in Chinese capital

    BEIJING (AP) — Much of China’s population can expect sub-standard sleep after the country starts ringing in the Year of the Monkey. The rat-a-tat snaps of firecrackers, whistling rockets and mortar-like fireworks with possibly enough gunpowder to down a small aircraft will make sure of that.

  • In this image released by Japan's Kyodo News agency, an unidentified object is photographed in the sky from Dandong, China, near the North Korean border, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016, at the same time a North Korea rocket was allegedly launched. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. (Minoru Iwasaki/Kyodo News via AP) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

    N. Korea praises launch, others see as covert missile test

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The U.N. Security Council condemned North Korea’s launch of a long-range rocket that world leaders called a banned test of ballistic missile technology and another “intolerable provocation.” The U.N.’s most powerful body pledged to quickly adopt a new resolution with “significant” new sanctions.

  • Christian group says China charges pastor with embezzling

    BEIJING (AP) — A Christian rights group says a pastor in a Chinese province where authorities have been cracking down on churches has been charged with embezzling funds.

  • In this April 29, 2015 photo, actor Zhang Jinlai in a Monkey King costume poses next to a wax figure base on his stage performance during a ceremony at the Madame Tussauds in Beijing. The Year of the Monkey gives a little-needed excuse to reference the much loved Monkey King character from the 16th century adventure novel “Journey to the West.” The supernatural Monkey King, also known as Sun Wukong, accompanied a monk on a journey to retrieve sacred scriptures and the story has inspired countless TV shows and movies over the years. Unashamedly trying to capitalize on the new zodiac year, yet another Monkey King adaptation will be released on the first day of the lunar new year - Feb. 8. (Chinatopix via AP) CHINA OUT

    Monkey Year inspires kung fu, predictions of fire, disease

    BEIJING (AP) — The new Chinese year is the one to go bananas over. On Feb. 8, the zodiac calendar enters the Year of the Monkey — the ninth of 12 animal signs. Plastic monkeys are adorning shopping centers and office buildings, and government departments have been giving out toy monkeys.