• Budget bill considered in New Mexico Legislature

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico’s Republican-led House of Representatives voted to approve a $6.3 billion budget that increases spending on Medicaid health care, early childhood education and prisons while cutting funding to state colleges and universities.

  • In this Jan. 27, 2016, file photo, an Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil. The mosquito behind the Zika virus seems to operate like a heat-driven missile of disease. Scientists say the hotter it gets, the better the mosquito that carries Zika virus is at transmitting a variety of dangerous illnesses. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)

    Health officials want more Zika samples, data from Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil is not sharing enough samples and disease data to let researchers determine whether the Zika virus is, as feared, linked to the increased number of babies born with abnormally small heads in the South American country, U.N. and U.S. health officials say.

  • Brazil's Health Minister Marcelo Castro speaks to the press before attending the Mercosur Health Ministers summit to address the spread of Zika virus in the region, at the Mercosur building in Montevideo, Uruguay, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016. The ministers of 13 countries are meeting to coordinate actions to try and fight the spread of the mosquito born virus. Castro said that efforts are being made to create a vaccine against it. (AP Photo/Matilde Campodonico)

    APNewsbreak: Few Zika samples being shared by Brazil

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — U.N. and U.S. health officials tell The Associated Press that Brazil has yet to share enough samples and disease data needed to answer the most worrying question about the Zika outbreak: whether the virus is actually responsible for the increase in the number of babies born with abnormally small heads in Brazil.

  • FILE-- A no-smoking sign with written in black "in the presence of infants and children including 12-year-olds, and of pregnant women"  is put up in a Naples playground, southern Italy, in this Monday Nov. 19, 2007 file photo. Smokers in Italy are now facing fines of up to 500 euros ($600) if they light up in a car with a child or pregnant woman _ or if they toss a cigarette butt on the street _ after new health and environmental laws went into effect Tuesday, Feb. 2, 2016.  (AP Photo/Salvatore Laporta )

    Smokers in Italy hit with new fines to protect the young

    ROME (AP) — Smokers in Italy are now facing fines of up to 500 euros ($600) if they light up in a car with a child or pregnant woman — or if they toss a cigarette butt on the street — after new health and environmental laws went into effect Tuesday.

  • Musicians play samba at a street carnival parade during which health workers distributed kits with information about the Zika virus, on Ipanema beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016. The sign reads in Portuguese : "Get out Zika."  Originally from Africa, Zika spread to Asia and was first registered in Brazil in the middle of last year, spreading like wildfire through the northeast thanks in part to the region's widespread poverty, equatorial heat and chronic infestations of the Aedes aegypti mosquito, which also spreads dengue fever and chikungunya. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    WHO declares global emergency over Zika virus spread

    GENEVA (AP) — The World Health Organization declared a global emergency over the explosive spread of the Zika virus, which has been linked to birth defects in the Americas, calling it an “extraordinary event” that poses a public health threat to other parts of the world.