• President Barack Obama lays a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknowns, on Memorial Day, Monday, May 30, 2016, at Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Va. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Obama marks Memorial Day at Arlington National Cemetery

    ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — President Barack Obama challenged Americans on Memorial Day to fill the silence from those who died serving their country with love and support for families of the fallen, “not just with words but with our actions.”

  • In this May 27, 2016 photo, Zachariah Fike, founder of the organization Purple Hearts Reunited, holds in St. Albans, Vt., a certificate issued to a World War I service member wounded in battle. Fike's Vermont-based non-profit group Purple Hearts Reunited is working to return 100 medals and certificates by next April, the 100th anniversary of the United States' entry into World War I. Over the years the organization has returned hundreds of lost Purple Hearts and other medals to the people who won them or their descendants. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring)

    A veteran’s race against time to return WWI Purple Hearts

    ST. ALBANS, Vt. (AP) — A group that seeks to reunite lost Purple Hearts with service members or their descendants is embarking on an ambitious project: to return 100 such medals or certificates earned in World War I before the 100th anniversary next April of the United States’ entry into the conflict.

  • In this photo taken Friday, April 22, 2016 resident Mouaz Abdullah Ibrahim of Iraq poses for a photo after an interview with The Associated Press at a refugee shelter in Berlin, Germany. Ibrahim fled Baiji last year amid fierce fighting between government forces and Islamic State extremists. (AP Photo/Michael Sohn)

    German rhetoric on Afghan migrants doesn’t meet reality

    BERLIN (AP) — The 75 people stuffed onto the small dinghy watched with horror as the water flowed in, eventually covering bags filled with clothes and mementos from the devastated homes they were fleeing. Jawad, a 25-year-old Afghan, prayed as he huddled with his wife, daughter and infant son.

  • In this undated and unknown location photo, the new leader of Taliban fighters, Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada poses for a portrait. Afghanistan's government has offered the new Taliban leader a choice: make peace or face the same fate as his predecessor, who was killed last week in a U.S. drone strike. (Afghan Islamic Press via AP)

    AP Analysis: Hopes for peace dim with new Taliban leader

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan’s government has offered the new Taliban leader a choice: make peace or face the same fate as his predecessor, killed in a U.S. drone strike last week. But Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada is a hard-liner who has used his religious credentials to justify the Taliban insurgency that has killed or wounded tens of thousands of Afghan civilians as a “holy war” and his succession has inspired little hope for an end to the bloodshed.

  • In this undated and unknown location photo, the new leader of Taliban fighters, Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada poses for a portrait. The Afghan Taliban confirmed on Wednesday that their leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour was killed in a U.S. drone strike last week and that they have appointed a successor - a scholar known for extremist views who is unlikely to back a peace process with Kabul. (Afghan Islamic Press via AP)

    Afghan Taliban appoint new leader after Mansour’s death

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Afghan Taliban confirmed on Wednesday that their leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour was killed in a U.S. drone strike last week and that they have appointed a successor — a scholar known for extremist views who is unlikely to back a peace process with Kabul.

  • Pakistan's Interior Minister, Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan addresses a news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Khan said authorities will perform DNA tests on the body of a man who was killed in an American drone strike to determine whether the slain man is actually Taliban chief Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour. Khan also condemned the drone strike, calling it a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

    Pakistan: DNA tests to confirm Taliban leaders death

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan’s Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said Tuesday that authorities will perform DNA tests on the body of a man who was killed in an American drone strike to determine whether the slain man is actually Taliban chief Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour.

  • A Pakistani police officer and paramedics stand beside two dead bodies reportedly killed in a U.S. drone strike in the Ahmad Wal area in Baluchistan province, Pakistan, at a hopsital in Quetta, Pakistan, Sunday, May 22, 2016. A senior commander of the Afghan Taliban confirmed on Sunday that the extremist group's leader, Mullah Mohammad Akhtar Mansour, had been killed in the strike. (AP Photo/Arshad Butt)

    Senior Taliban figure says death of leader could unify group

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The death of the leader of the Afghan Taliban in a U.S. drone strike last week could make the insurgent movement stronger by bringing back dissident commanders and unifying the movement’s ranks, a senior Afghan Taliban figure said on Tuesday.