• In this June 30, 2015 photo, Gilbert Arredondo, left, looks down as he talks about his town's water crisis, standing in front of his tenant's sons, in the community of Okieville, on the outskirts of Tulare, Calif. Arredondo had just informed his tenant, Tino Lozano, that the well connecting their houses had gone dry. The water is disappearing at a particularly alarming pace in their neighborhood, forcing neighbors to rig lines from house to house to share what underground water is still reachable from the deepest wells. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    When the wells run dry: California families cope in drought

    TULARE, Calif. (AP) — Looking for water to flush his toilet, Tino Lozano pointed a garden hose at some buckets in the bare dirt of his yard. It’s his daily ritual now in a community built by refugees from Oklahoma’s Dust Bowl. But only a trickle came out; then a drip, then nothing more.

  • In this June 30, 2015 photo, Gilbert Arredondo, left, looks down as he talks about his town's water crisis, standing in front of his tenant's sons, in the community of Okieville, on the outskirts of Tulare, Calif. Arredondo had just informed his tenant, Tino Lozano, that the well connecting their houses had gone dry. The water is disappearing at a particularly alarming pace in their neighborhood, forcing neighbors to rig lines from house to house to share what underground water is still reachable from the deepest wells. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    When the wells run dry: California families cope in drought

    TULARE, Calif. (AP) — Looking for water to flush his toilet, Tino Lozano pointed a garden hose at some buckets in the bare dirt of his yard. It’s his daily ritual now in a community built by refugees from Oklahoma’s Dust Bowl. But only a trickle came out; then a drip, then nothing more.

  • In this June 30, 2015 photo, Gilbert Arredondo, left, looks down as he talks about his town's water crisis, standing in front of his tenant's sons, in the community of Okieville, on the outskirts of Tulare, Calif. Arredondo had just informed his tenant, Tino Lozano, that the well connecting their houses had gone dry. The water is disappearing at a particularly alarming pace in their neighborhood, forcing neighbors to rig lines from house to house to share what underground water is still reachable from the deepest wells. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    When the wells run dry: California neighbors cope in drought

    TULARE, Calif. (AP) — Looking for water to flush his toilet, Tino Lozano pointed a garden hose at some buckets on the bare dirt of his yard. It’s his daily ritual now, in a community built by refugees from Oklahoma’s epic Dust Bowl drought. But only a trickle came out; then a drip, then nothing more.

  • In this June 23, 2015, file photo a lawn is irrigated in Sacramento, Calif. A report is due out Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015 on monthly state water conservation figures. Many California cities are conserving well, and officials are turning their attention to the few cities/agencies that aren’t doing so well. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

    California cut water use by 31 percent in July amid drought

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — California cities cut water use by a combined 31 percent in July, exceeding the governor’s statewide mandate to conserve, officials said Thursday.