• Satoshi Uematsu, the suspect of Tuesday's knife attack at a home for the mentally disabled, sits inside a police van as he leaves a police station in Sagamihara, outside Tokyo to be sent to prosecutors Wednesday, July 27, 2016. The deadliest mass killing in Japan in the post-World War II era raised questions about whether Japan's reputation as one of the safest countries in the world is creating a false sense of security. (Naohiko Hatta/Kyodo News via AP)

    Plot of mass killing got urgent attention in Japan, at first

    TOKYO (AP) — He wrote that he intended to kill disabled people and that his plot would benefit Japanese society. The facility where he worked was so unnerved, it confronted him. He quit the job and police sent him to a psychiatric hospital, but doctors deemed him safe to release 12 days later. In the months that followed, his former workplace increased security, adding cameras to watch the buildings where 150 mentally disabled people resided. But he was left alone, free, unmonitored.