• In this April 1, 2016 photo, a worker swipe the "Beijing Connect" old person's card for a customer at a steamed bread store in a supermarket in Beijing. When people over 80 in Beijing take a bus, see a doctor or spend money, their activities are digitally tracked by the government, as part of an effort to improve services for the country’s rapidly growing elderly population. The data amassed with each swipe of the multi-purpose "Beijing Connect" old person’s card goes into a massive database of the elderly in the capital. City authorities hope the information will enable them to better cope with their burgeoning population of over-60s, which already stands at 3 million. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    Beijing tracks the elderly as they take buses, go shopping

    BEIJING (AP) — These days, when people over 80 in Beijing take a bus, see a doctor or spend money, their activities are digitally tracked by the government, as part of an effort to improve services for the country’s rapidly growing elderly population.

  • In this Sunday, April 24, 2016 photo, Dr. Liu Jiaen, center, watches his staff member work on a laboratory dish during an infertility treatment through in vitro fertilization (IVF) for a patient at a hospital in Beijing. China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue. The rise in IVF points to the deferred dreams of many parents who long wanted a second child, but were prevented by a strict population control policy in place for more than 30 years. (AP Photo/Andy Wong)

    Finally allowed 2nd child, older Chinese parents turn to IVF

    BEIJING (AP) — China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue.

    Updated: 8:27 pm

  • In this Jan. 18, 2016 file photo, Wang Jianlin, chairman of Wanda Group, delivers a speech at the Ninth Asian Financial Forum in Hong Kong. Wanda Group and its billionaire founder, Wang Jianlin, are inaugurating a sprawling entertainment complex Saturday, May 28 in China's southeast three weeks before the June 16 opening of Disney's first mainland Chinese park in Shanghai. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

    China’s Wanda prepares for battle with ‘old brand’ Disney

    BEIJING (AP) — Mickey Mouse has a new and deep-pocketed challenger: China’s shopping mall king.