• Kaushik Raghu, Senior Staff Engineer at Audi, is reflected in the passenger side visor mirror while demonstrating an Audi self driving vehicle on I-395 expressway in Arlington, Va., Friday, July 15, 2016. Experts say the development of self-driving cars over the coming decade depends on an unreliable assumption by most automakers: that the humans in them will be ready to step in and take control if the car's systems fail. Experience with automation in other modes of transportation suggests that strategy will lead to more deaths like that of a Florida Tesla driver in May. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

    Plans for self-driving cars have pitfall: the human brain

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Experts say the development of self-driving cars over the coming decade depends on an unreliable assumption by many automakers: that the humans in them will be ready to step in and take control if the car’s systems fail.