• IN this Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016 file photo, a man walks past a PAC-3 Patriot missile unit deployed for North Korea's rocket launch at the Defense Ministry in Tokyo. Japan has deployed PAC-3 missile batteries in the heart of Tokyo to defend its airspace from incoming rocket debris. South Korea is reportedly mobilizing two Aegis-equipped destroyers. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi, File)

    Experts say launch won’t bring N. Korea much closer to ICBM

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan has deployed PAC-3 missile batteries in the heart of Tokyo to shoot down any incoming rocket debris. South Korea is reportedly mobilizing two Aegis-equipped destroyers. The U.S. is already gunning to punish Pyongyang for what it says will be a ballistic missile test in the guise of a space launch.

  • Kim Jong Un calls meeting on abuses in N. Korea ruling party

    TOKYO (AP) — North Korean leader Kim Jong Un presided over a meeting of senior ruling party officials aimed at rooting out corruption and abuses of power ahead of a major congress to be held in May, its state media reported Thursday, calling the gathering the first of its kind.

  • In this July 26, 2013, photo, North Korean soldiers are silhouetted against model versions of the Unha 3 space launch vehicle which successfully delivered North Korea’s first satellite into Earth orbit, and the Unha 9, right, which would carry a lunar orbiter, on display at an annual flower show held in honor of national founder Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Less than a month after its purported H-bomb test, the exact nature of which still has foreign analysts guessing, attention is now focused on whether North Korea is readying a rocket launch. There are indications including the construction of a new and taller gantry, visible in commercial satellite imagery that it could be a bigger and better version of the Unha 3 space launch vehicle that lifted off from the Sohae facility in 2012, on the west coast of North Korea. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    North Korea getting better at hiding nuke, rocket tests

    TOKYO (AP) — Less than a month after its purported H-bomb test, North Korea announced Tuesday it is planning a rocket launch as soon as next week. Though speculation of a launch had been growing for about a week, experts say that with underground railways, giant tarps and a movable launch pad structure in place the North is getting a lot better at hiding its preparations.