• A girl stands with a bouquet of flowers as people wait for Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro to arrive at Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Russian leader Vladimir Putin, South Korean President Park Geun-hye and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shine at the top of China’s guest list at this week’s grand commemorations of the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II, but high-level representatives from Western democracies are largely absent. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China parade draws Putin, but few other major world leaders

    BEIJING (AP) — Russian leader Vladimir Putin, South Korean President Park Geun-hye and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shine at the top of China’s guest list at this week’s grand commemorations of the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II. After them, the wattage gets pretty low.

    Updated: 5:02 am

  • In this Aug. 22, 2015 file photo, Chinese President Xi Jinping attends the opening ceremony of the World Athletics Championships at the Bird's Nest stadium in Beijing.  Despite growing anger among retail investors and a strong sense of economic decline, a major shakeup is unlikely, given the rigidity of the political system, the leadership’s need to exude calm and the idea that changes could be perceived as signs of weakness or error.  Having accumulated more power than any Chinese leader in 20 years, President Xi is expected to stay the course in hopes that the market will correct itself and the economy returns to an even keel.  (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man, File)

    China’s Xi staying the course despite sliding economy

    BEIJING (AP) — What does China’s leadership lose politically as a result of the country’s precipitous stock market decline? A bit of international swagger, but probably not much else — for now.