• People cross a street in front of an electronic stock indicator of a securities firm in Tokyo, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. Chinese stocks gained Tuesday but other Asian markets fell after Wall Street declined on losses for energy stocks. (AP Photo/Shizuo Kambayashi)

    Stocks slightly higher as investors monitor company earnings

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stocks were mixed on Wednesday ahead of the Federal Reserve’s policy statement, as strong U.S. economic data raised questions over the likely course for interest rates.

  • New Mexico lawmaker eyes ‘right to die’ bill amid court loss

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A New Mexico state lawmaker is pushing for a law to allow terminally ill patients to end their lives with help from doctors a month after advocates for the practice suffered a court defeat.

  • New Mexico permanent funds shrink amid energy bust

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez indicated Tuesday that the state may be headed toward a special legislative session to address dwindling state operating reserves.

  • In this July 18, 2016 photo, Sri Lankan mangrove conservation workers carry mangrove saplings for planting in Kalpitiya, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) north of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests _ the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, better absorb carbon from the environment mitigating effects of global warming and reducing impact of natural disasters like tsunamis. Authorities have identified about 37,000 acres (15,000 hectares) of mangrove forests in Sri Lanka that are earmarked for preservation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    Sri Lanka to conserve climate-friendly mangroves ecosystem

    PAMBALA LAGOON, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests — the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, absorb carbon from the environment and reduce the impact of natural disasters like tsunamis.

  • The Solar Impulse 2 plane flies over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, shortly before landing on Tuesday, July 26, 2016. The world's first ever round-the-world flight to be powered solely by the sun's energy made history with its landing in the Emirati capital, where it first took off more than a year ago. (AP Photo/Adam Schreck)

    Solar plane’s arrival highlights UAE’s clean-energy push

    ABU DHABI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The United Arab Emirates might not seem like an obvious spot to begin and end a globe-spanning flight promoting renewable energy.

  • In this Saturday, July 16, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem pulls weeds on a tomato farm in Ramtha, Jordan. He's among thousands of displaced Syrians who recently obtained work permits as part of Jordan's promise to the international community to put 50,000 refugees to work legally by the end of the year in exchange for interest-free loans and easier access to European markets. So far, some 23,000 Syrians have been given work permits in the kingdom under the deal, aimed in part at keeping refugees in the region with a promise of jobs and education for their children, and deterring them from moving on to Europe. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordan deal with donors means legal work for Syria refugees

    RAMTHA, Jordan (AP) — Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem used to drop his tools and run when he saw police approaching the farm in northern Jordan where he has been picking vegetables for the past three years.

  • In this Wednesday, July 13, 2016 file photo, members of the New York Liberty basketball team await the start of a game against the Atlanta Dream in New York. The WNBA is withdrawing its fines for teams and players that showed support of citizens and police involved in recent shootings by wearing black warmup shirts before and during games. WNBA President Lisa Borders said in a statement Saturday, July 23, the league was rescinding penalties given to the Indiana Fever, New York Liberty, Phoenix Mercury and their players for wearing the shirts–which was a uniform violation. The players started wearing them to show solidarity after shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    WNBA president on rescinded fines: We needed to move forward

    NEW YORK (AP) — WNBA President Lisa Borders says she hopes that rescinding the fines the league imposed over black warmup shirts worn in solidarity for shooting victims will lead to a fresh start on social activism for the players and their union.

  • NFL, players union announce new game-day concussion protocol

    NEW YORK (AP) — The NFL and the players association have announced a new policy regarding game-day concussion protocol and discipline for clubs that violate the procedure.

  • In this Oct. 31, 1998 photo, a salesclerk shows high quality VHS video casette recorders at a home and electrical appliance store in Osaka. Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it's yanking the plug on the world's last video cassette recorder. A company spokesman, who requested anonymity citing company practice, confirmed Monday, July 25, 2016 that production will end sometime this month, although he would not give a date. (Kyodo News via AP) JAPAN OUT, MANDATORY CREDIT

    Farewell to VCRs: Japanese maker to shelve once-hit product

    TOKYO (AP) — Japanese electronics maker Funai Electric Co. says it’s yanking the plug on the world’s last video cassette recorder.

  • APNewsBreak: Arkansas execution drug likely from Pfizer unit

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — An execution drug obtained by the Arkansas prison system this month appears to have been made by a subsidiary of Pfizer, even though the pharmaceutical giant has said it doesn’t want its drugs to be used in executions.