• Chinese stock investors play cards at a brokerage house in Fuyang in central China's Anhui province Friday, Nov. 27, 2015. China's stock market fell sharply Friday as investigations into the securities industry widened to include two top brokerages. (Chinatopix via AP) CHINA OUT

    China shares slide as brokers investigated

    TOKYO (AP) — Global stocks were mostly lower in muted trading Friday, after Wall Street was closed for Thanksgiving, but China’s market fell sharply as investigations into the securities industry widened to include two top brokerages.

    Updated: 2:08 am

  • In this July 13, 2015 photo, during a visit with her birth mother and other family, in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, adoptee Mariette Williams shows pictures of herself, made when she was living at a Haitian orphanage in the mid 80's. For the first time in nearly 30 years, Mariette was reunited with her birth mother. Mariette was adopted by a Canadian couple in October 1986. (AP Photo/Dieu Nalio Chery)

    A search for family in Haiti raises questions about adoption

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti (AP) — As Mariette Williams waited for her flight from South Florida to Haiti, she paced the departure lounge, folding and re-folding her ticket and clutching the handle of a bag sagging with gifts. She was excited but terrified: For the first time in nearly 30 years, she was about to see her mother.

    Updated: 11:31 pm

  • This photo taken Nov. 18, 2015 shows a close-up of a lawsuit filed by North Carolina state troopers who argue that the state reneged on pay raises that were promised to them when they were hired. Troopers say the situation has caused them financial hardship, forcing some to work second jobs and others to accept food stamps or other government assistance. (AP Photo/Allen G. Breed)

    Troopers on food stamps, taking second jobs amid pay fight

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — State troopers suing North Carolina for millions of dollars in back pay say the state’s broken promises have forced them into tough spots: working second jobs, moving in with parents, even going on food stamps.

  • This Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2015 frame grab from video by Haberturk TV, shows a Russian warplane on fire before crashing on a hill as seen from Hatay province, Turkey. The Russian plane shot down by Turkey on Tuesday was operating over the Turkmen Mountain region in Syria's Latakia province, and one of the Russian pilots was captured by a rebel group that includes local Turkmen fighters. The Turkmen in Syria were among the first to take up arms against Syrian government forces, as Turkey lent its support to rebels seeking to topple President Bashar Assad. They have looked to Turkey for support and protection. (Haberturk TV via AP) TURKEY OUT

    Turkey-Russia spat over downed Russian warplane escalates

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — A tug-of-war over a Russian warplane downed by a Turkish fighter jet at the border with Syria escalated Thursday, with Moscow drafting a slew of economic sanctions against Turkey and the Turkish president defiantly declaring that his military will shoot down any new intruder.

    Updated: 8:30 pm

  • Customers wait outside a Best Buy store before it opens on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015, in Minnetonka, Minn. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

    Holiday shoppers get a head start on Thanksgiving

    NEW YORK (AP) — Black Friday used to kick off the holiday shopping season, but now Thanksgiving Day is the new tradition for some shoppers.

    Updated: 10:48 pm

  • In this Sunday, Oct. 4, 2015, file photo, Portuguese Socialist leader Antonio Costa addresses supporters following the announcement of the results of Portugal's general elections, in Lisbon. There are many similarities in the economies of Greece and Portugal, but Costa intends to scale back on many austerity measures, saying his goal is to put more money in Portuguese pockets to fire up the economy. (AP Photo/Steven Governo, File)

    Is Portugal about to go down the same road as Greece?

    LISBON, Portugal (AP) — An anti-austerity alliance including radical leftist parties takes power. A shaky economy and huge debts menace the national economy. The rest of Europe watches with a wary eye.

  • This Aug. 12, 2012, photo, taken at a research farm at the University of Nevada, Reno, and provided by the university, shows curly cup gumweed, a sticky cousin of the sunflower that is the target of research into efforts to use it to produce biofuels. UNR environmental sciences professor Glenn Miller and a team of scientists are in the second year of a four-year project funded by a $500,000 grant from the USDA. (Whip Villarreal/University of Nevada, Reno via AP)

    Nevada researchers trying to turn roadside weed into biofuel

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — Three decades ago, a University of Nevada researcher who obtained one of the first U.S. Energy Department grants to study the potential to turn plants into biofuels became convinced that a roadside weed — curly top gumweed — was growing along the road to the future.

  • Widows: Railroad knew of defect before veterans killed

    LUBBOCK, Texas (AP) — Intensive care nurse Angie Boivin had just tended to a woman whose leg was severed near the hip when she saw her husband Larry lying nearby under an American flag blanket. She says that she was with him when he took his last breath.

  • In this Oct. 19, 2007 photo, Simon Wallace, center, picks Granny Smith apples from a ladder while coworkers Everal Edwards, left, and Victor Spence, right, pick from lower branches at Lyman Orchards in Middlefield, Conn., where more than 20 varieties of apples are grown. Lyman Orchards has operated through wars, financial panics and a freeze that destroyed its peach crop. As they prepare to celebrate its 275th year in operation in 2016, the family is looking to cultivate its ninth generation of owner-operators. (Cloe Poisson/The Hartford Courant via AP)

    Connecticut family-owned farm to celebrate 275 years

    MIDDLEFIELD, Conn. (AP) — Through wars, financial panics and a freeze that destroyed its peach crop a century ago, eight generations of the Lyman family have sustained its farm in the hills of central Connecticut.

    Updated: 5:30 pm

  • People walk by a logo of Volkswagen at a dealership in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, Nov. 26, 2015.  South Korea said Thursday it fined Volkswagen $12.3 million and ordered recalls of 125,522 diesel vehicles after the government found their emissions tests were rigged. (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon)

    South Korea: VW rigged emissions in 125,000 diesel vehicles

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korea said Thursday it fined Volkswagen $12.3 million and ordered recalls of 125,522 diesel vehicles after the government found their emissions tests were rigged.