• International Olympic Committee President Thomas Bach, 3rd right, front row, poses for the medida with the torch of the Lillehammer 2016 Winter Youth Olympic Games with Olympic Gold medalist Kjetil Jansrud of Norway, center, and young ambassadors and volunteers of the games, in Lillehammer, Norway, Friday Feb. 12, 2016. (Jed Leicester/IOC via AP)

    Bach: ‘No intention’ by any countries to pull out of Rio

    LILLEHAMMER, Norway (AP) — IOC President Thomas Bach said Friday that no countries intend to pull out of the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro over concerns about the Zika virus.

    Updated: 6:43 am

  • FILE- In this July 30, 2015 file photo, Richard Budgett, the IOC medical director, speaks to the Associated Press during an interview in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Seeking to calm fears over the Zika outbreak, the IOC medical director told The Associated Press on Thursday Feb. 11, 2016 that “everything that can be done is being done’’ to combat the virus in Brazil and provide safe conditions for athletes at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian, File)

    AP Interview: IOC medical chief seeks to allay Zika fears

    LONDON (AP) — Seeking to allay fears over the Zika outbreak, the IOC medical director said “everything that can be done is being done” to combat the virus in Brazil and provide safe conditions for athletes at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro.

    Updated: 9:37 pm

  • United States' Becky Sauerbrunn, left, and Hope Solo, right, stand during the playing of the national anthem before the team's CONCACAF Olympic qualifying tournament soccer match against Costa Rica on Wednesday, Feb. 10, 2016, in Frisco, Texas. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

    Hope Solo reiterates concerns over Zika at the Olympics

    FRISCO, Texas (AP) — U.S. women’s national team goalkeeper Hope Solo asserted that if the Olympics were held today, she would not go out of concern about the Zika virus.

  • Workers holds a flag that reads in portugues "Out Zika" as part of a campaign to warn people about the spread of the Zika virus during carnival celebrations at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Aussie Olympic doctor says Rio water bigger worry than Zika

    BRISBANE, Australia (AP) — The Australian team’s medical director says water quality will be more of a threat to the health of athletes and officials at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro than the mosquito-borne Zika virus.

  • US women’s national soccer team to be briefed on Zika virus

    The U.S. women’s national soccer team was scheduled to be briefed Tuesday night on the developing Zika virus crisis in Latin America, a day before the start of the CONCACAF Olympic qualification tournament in Texas.

  • In this Nov. 5, 2015, file photo, trash floats in the Meriti River, which flows into Guanabara Bay in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A major Brazilian daily said Tuesday, Feb. 9, 2016, that the Rio de Janeiro state governor wants to use money earmarked for an environmental fund to cover shortfalls in civil servants’ pensions. The Rio de Janeiro State Environmental Protection Fund has been used to improve sewage treatment centers and begin cleaning lakes, rivers and Guanabara Bay, a water sports venue for the upcoming Olympic games. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo, File)

    Brazil governor wants environmental fund to pay pensions

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The Rio de Janeiro state governor wants to use money earmarked for an environmental fund being used to clean up waterways before the upcoming Olympics to cover shortfalls in civil servants’ pensions, a major Brazilian daily said Tuesday.

  • Workers holds a flag that reads in portugues "Out Zika" as part of a campaign to warn people about the spread of the Zika virus during carnival celebrations at the Sambadrome in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

    Kenya planning on track for Rio Olympics; No Zika boycott

    NAIROBI, Kenya (AP) — Kenya is preparing as planned for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics while also monitoring the outbreak of the Zika virus in Brazil, the official in charge of the country’s team said Tuesday.

  • "Caretas" performers sit next to an elderly woman during Carnival celebrations in Triunfo, Brazil, Monday, Feb. 8, 2016. Revelers take to the streets in hand-made costumes that feature huge hats, long whips _ and scowling masks.  (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Frowning masks and whips highlight Carnival in Brazil town

    TRIUNFO, Brazil (AP) — Far from the glitz and glamour of Rio de Janeiro’s famous Sambadrome parades, people in this northeast Brazilian town put a frown on their Carnival celebration.

  • Laurinaldo Alves adjusts the pacifier of his daughter Luana Vitoria, who suffers from microcephaly, during a physical stimulation session at the Altino Ventura foundation, a treatment center that provides free health care, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Brazil is in the midst of a Zika outbreak and authorities say they have also detected a spike in cases of microcephaly in newborn children, but the link between Zika and microcephaly is as yet unproven. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

    Brazil considers reforming biosecurity law amid criticism

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazilian officials will soon decide whether to amend the South American nation’s rigid procedures for sharing Zika samples, the Cabinet chief’s spokeswoman said Friday, as officials announced that they were sending a set of samples to U.S. researchers amid complaints of hoarding.

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2016 file photo, a health workers stands in the Sambadrome spraying insecticide to combat the Aedes aegypti mosquito that transmits the Zika virus in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Inspectors begin to spray insecticide around Sambadrome, the outdoor grounds where thousands of dancers and musicians will parade during the city's Feb. 5-10 Carnival celebrations. Brazil's health minister says the country will mobilize some 220,000 troops to battle the mosquito blamed for spreading a virus linked to birth defects. (AP Photo/Leo Correa, File)

    Historian: Zika won’t stop Olympics; only war has done that

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The world’s best known Olympic historian said Friday it will take something more destructive than the Zika virus to cancel the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.