• U.S. President Barack Obama lays a wreath at Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima, western, Japan, Friday, May 27, 2016. Obama on Friday became the first sitting U.S. president to visit the site of the world's first atomic bomb attack, bringing global attention both to survivors and to his unfulfilled vision of a world without nuclear weapons. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Obama at Hiroshima: ‘Death fell from the sky’

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — President Barack Obama paid tribute Friday to the “silent cry” of the 140,000 victims of the atomic bomb dropped 71 years ago on Hiroshima, and called on the world to abandon “the logic of fear” that encourages the stockpiling of nuclear weapons.

    Updated: 6:55 am

  • With the Atomic Bomb Dome as a backdrop, passers-by move past riot police near Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum in Hiroshima, southwestern Japan, Thursday, May 26, 2016. U.S. President Barack Obama is to visit Hiroshima on Friday, May 27 after the Group of Seven summit in central Japan, becoming the first serving American president to do so. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama)

    Obama’s every gesture will be scrutinized in Hiroshima visit

    HIROSHIMA, Japan (AP) — Every gesture. Every word uttered or avoided. Every person Barack Obama speaks with, listens to and stands beside in Hiroshima. All of it will help determine the success of a trip with huge potential political and diplomatic pitfalls, both in America and Asia.

  • U.S. President Barack Obama, left, talks with Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on the Ujibashi bridge as they visit the Ise Jingu shrine in Ise, Mie prefecture, Japan Thursday, May 26, 2016 , ahead of the first session of the G-7 summit meetings. When Obama and Abe make a historic visit to Hiroshima - the first time a sitting U.S. president has visited the site of the first atomic bomb attack - their words advocating nuclear disarmament will clash with real-world security necessities. (Toru Hanai/Pool Photo via AP)

    Nuclear-free aspirations of Obama, Abe conflict with reality

    TOBA, Japan (AP) — There is the soaring rhetoric. And then there’s the messy reality.

  • In this May 3, 2016 file photo, World War II veteran Lester Tenney, 95, holds a bamboo stick that he said Japanese soldiers used to beat him while he was held as a prisoner of war, at his home in Carlsbad, Calif. The former Army staff sergeant believes President Barack Obama should keep ex-POWs like him and others in mind when he makes his historic visit to Hiroshima on Friday, May 27. (AP Photo/Julie Watson, File)

    VOICES: Hiroshima serves as memorial for all victims of WWII

    CARLSBAD, Calif. (AP) — The suffering he endured during World War II still haunts 95-year-old Lester Tenney, who has black lung disease from working as a prisoner of war in a Japanese coal mine.

  • In this Tuesday, Dec. 25, 2012, file photo, Israeli Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman walks under a screen showing him and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during the inauguration of their election campaign in Jerusalem. Israel’s incoming defense minister once called for bombing Egypt, just weeks ago suggested that Israel kill Hamas’ leader in the Gaza Strip and has opposed prosecution of a soldier accused of manslaughter _ just a few of the positions that could put former bar bouncer Avigdor Lieberman at odds with a military he now commands. (AP Photo/Dan Balilty, File)

    Israel’s new defense minister could clash with his soldiers

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel’s incoming defense minister once called for bombing Egypt, suggested just weeks ago that Israel kill Hamas’ leader in the Gaza Strip and opposed the prosecution of a soldier accused of killing a wounded Palestinian. These are just a few of the positions that could put former bar bouncer Avigdor Lieberman at odds with the military he now commands.

  • In this May 11, 2016 photo, Terumi Tanaka, secretary general of Japan Confederation of A-and H-bomb Sufferers Organizations, speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in Tokyo. The debate over whether U.S. President Barack Obama should apologize to Japanese survivors of America’s atomic bombings in World War II made Tanaka think: What about his own government? Tanaka was 13 when the U.S. dropped its second atomic bomb on Nagasaki city on Aug. 9, 1945, three days after the first on Hiroshima.(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    VOICES: A-bomb survivors leader says Japan shares blame, too

    TOKYO (AP) — The debate over whether President Barack Obama should apologize to Japanese survivors of America’s atomic bombings in World War II made Terumi Tanaka think: What about his own government?

  • In this March 31, 2016, file photo, South Korean President Park Geun-hye, left, shakes hands with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as U.S. President Barack Obama watches after their meeting at the Nuclear Security Summit in Washington. By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin, File)

    Obama’s Hiroshima trip parachutes him into history disputes

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — By visiting Hiroshima, Barack Obama parachutes himself into a seemingly endless dispute among key U.S. allies and trading partners over World War II. In Tokyo’s decades-long tug-of-war over history with its neighbors China and South Korea, it’s the American president who could end up losing.

  • In this Tuesday, May 17, 2016, file photo, a masked member of an Iraqi Shiite fighters militant group called Kataib Peace Brigades, a Shiite militia group loyal to Shiite cleric Muqtada al-Sadr, center, carries his militant flag as he takes to the street after a suicide car bombing hit a crowded outdoor market in Baghdad's eastern Shiite neighborhood of Sadr City, Iraq. Even as Iraq slowly claws back territory from the Islamic State group, faith in the government is crumbling among many, particularly Shiites, angered by political disarray and the continual pounding of the capital by militants’ bombings. (AP Photo/ Karim Kadim, File)

    IS attacks undermine Iraqi state in war weary capital

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Even as Iraq slowly claws back territory from the Islamic State group, faith in the government is crumbling among many, particularly the country’s Shiites, angered by political disarray and the continual pounding of the capital, Baghdad, by militants’ bombings.

  • In this photo released by the Syrian official news agency SANA, Syrians gather in front of a burning car at the scene where suicide bombers blew themselves up, in the coastal town of Tartus, Syria, Monday, May 23, 2016. Syrian TV said suicide bombers blew themselves followed by a car bomb in a parking lot packed during morning rush hour. (SANA via AP)

    The Latest: IS claims deadly blasts in 2 Syrian cities

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — The Latest on a violent day in the Middle East, with deadly bombings in Syria and Yemen and the start of an Iraqi government offensive to retake the city of Fallujah from the Islamic State group (all times local):

  • President Barack Obama winks as he arrives for a news conference with Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang, Monday, May 23, 2016, at the International Convention Center in Hanoi, Vietnam. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama lifts decades-old arms ban in his 1st visit to Vietnam

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Eager to banish lingering shadows of the Vietnam War, President Barack Obama lifted the U.S. embargo on selling arms to America’s former enemy Monday and made the case for a more trusting and prosperous relationship going forward. Activists said the president was being too quick to gloss over serious human rights abuses in his push to establish warmer ties.