• In this Aug. 22, 2015 file photo, Chinese female troops practice marching near a billboard showing Chinese President Xi Jinping and the slogan "Strive to build a People's Liberation Army that obeys the Party, Wins the war and has outstanding work style“ at a camp on the outskirts of Beijing. China is leaning on the animal kingdom - including a squad of nest-wrecking monkeys - to ensure its military parade commemorating the end of World War II goes smoothly. To minimize the chances of birds striking engines during the many airplane flyovers connected to the Beijing parade, state media reports say, the military has used falcons to chase away birds and a team of trained macaques to flush nests out of trees around the pilots’ training grounds. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

    China enlists monkeys to keep birds from spoiling big parade

    BEIJING (AP) — China is leaning on the animal kingdom — including a squad of nest-wrecking monkeys — to ensure its military parade commemorating the end of World War II goes smoothly.

    Updated: 6:11 am

  • A Penguin runs out of the ocean after swimming with other penguins at Boulders beach a popular tourist destination in Simon's Town, South Africa, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015.  The penguins on South Africa's west coast are a big tourist attraction, but their numbers have declined and scientists are still debating whether fishing has helped push the species to the brink of extinction. (AP Photo/Schalk van Zuydam)

    Scientists squabble while Africa’s only penguins perish

    CAPE TOWN, South Africa (AP) — They’re cute, knee-high, they bray like donkeys and are a tourist attraction near Cape Town. But African Penguins — the continent’s only species of the flightless bird — are at risk of extinction.