• In this Aug. 22, 2015 file photo, Chinese female troops practice marching near a billboard showing Chinese President Xi Jinping and the slogan "Strive to build a People's Liberation Army that obeys the Party, Wins the war and has outstanding work style“ at a camp on the outskirts of Beijing. China is leaning on the animal kingdom - including a squad of nest-wrecking monkeys - to ensure its military parade commemorating the end of World War II goes smoothly. To minimize the chances of birds striking engines during the many airplane flyovers connected to the Beijing parade, state media reports say, the military has used falcons to chase away birds and a team of trained macaques to flush nests out of trees around the pilots’ training grounds. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

    China enlists monkeys to keep birds from spoiling big parade

    BEIJING (AP) — China is leaning on the animal kingdom — including a squad of nest-wrecking monkeys — to ensure its military parade commemorating the end of World War II goes smoothly.

    Updated: 9:50 am

  • This Oct. 2, 2014, file photo, shows the Wall Street entrance of the New York Stock Exchange. World stocks were wobbly Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2015, on uncertainty over the economic outlook while China's markets minimized losses amid speculation Beijing was intervening to support prices. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File)

    Asian stock markets fluctuate on signs of China support

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are opening broadly higher as the market bounces back from a plunge the day before.

    Updated: 7:42 am

  • In this Saturday, June 27, 2015, photo, an Air Koryo plane sits on the tarmac in front of the new Pyongyang International Airport terminal building, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Air Koryo is the only carrier to have been awarded just one star in rankings released recently by the UK-based SkyTrax consultancy agency. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

    Is N. Korean airline world’s worst? It may be the quirkiest

    PYONGYANG, North Korea (AP) — If an Air Koryo passenger ignores its no-photography rule, a flight attendant might take the camera and delete the pictures herself. Crumpling up a newspaper bearing the image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un can earn travelers a stern lecture, or worse.

    Updated: 2:25 am

  • In this Aug. 22, 2015 file photo, a Chinese military vehicle carrying what appears to be covered short-range ballistic missiles rolls down a main avenue during a rehearsal for a large military parade in Beijing. When China rolls out its latest armaments Thursday, Sept. 3, for a lavish parade commemorating the defeat of Japan in World War II, defense experts and foreign armies will be watching closely for any revelations about new military capabilities. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan, File)

    A preview of new gear China’s military showing off at parade

    BEIJING (AP) — When China rolls out its latest armaments Thursday for a lavish parade commemorating the defeat of Japan in World War II, defense experts and foreign armies will be watching closely for any revelations about new military capabilities.

    Updated: 2:27 am

  • A girl stands with a bouquet of flowers as people wait for Venezuela's President Nicolas Maduro to arrive at Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing, China, Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015. Russian leader Vladimir Putin, South Korean President Park Geun-hye and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shine at the top of China’s guest list at this week’s grand commemorations of the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II, but high-level representatives from Western democracies are largely absent. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China parade draws Putin, but few other major world leaders

    BEIJING (AP) — Russian leader Vladimir Putin, South Korean President Park Geun-hye and U.N. Secretary General Ban Ki-moon shine at the top of China’s guest list at this week’s grand commemorations of the 70th anniversary of Japan’s defeat in World War II. After them, the wattage gets pretty low.

  • Monday, August 31, 2015

    Thai prime minister says main suspect in deadly Bangkok bombing has been arrested near border

  • In this Aug. 27, 2015 file photo, Naga sadhu, or naked Hindu holy man, pauses inside a tent during Kumbh Mela, or Pitcher festival, at Trimbakeshwar, India. Hindus believe taking a dip in the waters of a holy river during the festival will cleanse them of their sins. The festival is held four times every 12 years. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue, File)

    AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from Asia

    It was a week of market turmoil, athletic championships and an important Hindu festival.

  • In this photo taken July 20, 2015, Chinese veteran Sun Yibai, 97, pausea during an interview at this home in Beijing. Veterans such as Sun have long found themselves on the wrong side of the Communist historical narrative. Their service with the Nationalists led to imprisonment, persecution and often death in the years after the 1949 communist revolution. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    China gives little credit, or help, to Nationalist WWII vets

    BEIJING (AP) — Chinese veteran Sun Yibai doesn’t have much time for the Communist Party’s claim to have led China to victory against Japan in World War II.

  • Jamaica's Usain Bolt holds his gold medal to teammates Nickel Ashmeade, Asafa Powell and Nesta Carter on the podium during the ceremony for the men's 4x100m relay final at the World Athletics Championships at the Bird's Nest stadium in Beijing, Sunday, Aug. 30, 2015. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

    Usain Bolt points to Rio with more gold in his hands

    BEIJING (AP) — Hard as this is to believe, there were questions about Usain Bolt when the world championships first started.

  • In this Aug. 24, 2015 file photo, Chinese investors monitor stock prices at a brokerage house in Beijing. A series of bungled decisions have escalated doubts about Beijing’s economic stewardship. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

    Doubts about China’s economic leadership sap confidence

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The fear that gripped financial markets this month is a stark one: That China’s economy might be slipping into a decline that could persist for years.