• In this Aug. 9, 2008, file photo, China's Chen Xiexia holds up 90kg in the snatch of the women's 48kg category of the weightlifting competition at the Beijing 2008 Olympics in Beijing, China. The International Weightlifting Federation on Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016, said that 11 2008 Olympic athletes tested positive in retests, including Chen, for a range of banned substances in the latest scandal to shake the sport, which is already processing retests which caught numerous medalists from the 2008 and 2012 games. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)

    China faces 1-year ban from weightlifting over doping

    MOSCOW (AP) — China is facing a one-year ban from weightlifting over repeated doping cases in a move which threatens to stop some of the world’s top athletes from competing internationally.

  • In this June 10, 2005 file photo, workers walk past a part of the Qinshan No. 2 Nuclear Power Plant, China's first self-designed and self-built national commercial nuclear power plant in Qinshan, about 125 kilometers (about 90 miles) southwest of Shanghai, China. Beijing's wants to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    China sets sights on new global export: nuclear energy

    BEIJING (AP) — On a seaside field south of Shanghai, workers are constructing a nuclear reactor that is the flagship for Beijing’s ambition to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology.

  • Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, center, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, left, and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se pose for the photographers before their trilateral meeting in Tokyo, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The foreign ministers of China, Japan and South Korea have criticized North Korea's fresh missile launch just hours earlier in the day. (Katsumi Kasahara/Pool Photo via AP)

    Japan, China, S. Korea ministers slam N. Korea missile test

    TOKYO (AP) — The foreign ministers of China, Japan and South Korea made a rare display of unity Wednesday to sharply criticize North Korea’s latest submarine missile test.

  • In this June 10, 2005 file photo, workers walk past a part of the Qinshan No. 2 Nuclear Power Plant, China's first self-designed and self-built national commercial nuclear power plant in Qinshan, about 125 kilometers (about 90 miles) southwest of Shanghai, China. Beijing's wants to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    China sets sights on new global export: nuclear energy

    BEIJING (AP) — On a seaside field south of Shanghai, workers are constructing a nuclear reactor that is the flagship for Beijing’s ambition to compete with the United States, France and Russia as an exporter of atomic power technology.

  • Japanese Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida, center, Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi, left, and South Korean Foreign Minister Yun Byung-se pose for the photographers before their trilateral meeting in Tokyo, Wednesday, Aug. 24, 2016. The foreign ministers of China, Japan and South Korea have criticized North Korea's fresh missile launch just hours earlier in the day. (Katsumi Kasahara/Pool Photo via AP)

    Japan, China, S. Korea ministers slam N. Korea missile test

    TOKYO (AP) — The foreign ministers of China, Japan and South Korea criticized North Korea’s latest submarine missile test on Wednesday during their annual talks that were held amid lingering frictions over territorial disputes and wartime history.

  • Tokyo governor Yuriko Koike waves the Olympic flag during the closing ceremony in the Maracana stadium at the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Sunday, Aug. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)

    Tokyo prepares for 2020, facing rising costs and new sports

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike is preparing for a strenuous workout with the next Summer Olympics headed her way.

  • In this May 28, 2016, file photo, Tibetan exhibitors check on their phones at their booth displaying their products during the China International Fair and Trade in Beijing. Tensions have been rising over China’s assertive behavior in the seas of Asia. The U.S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets. Donald Trump says that the sheer volume of trade gives the U.S. leverage over China. He accuses China of undervaluing its currency to make its exports artificially cheap and proposes tariffs as high as 45 percent on Chinese imports if Beijing doesn’t change its behavior. Such action could risk a trade war that would make many products in the U.S. more expensive. Clinton says the U.S. needs to press the rising Asian power to play by international rules, whether on trade or territorial disputes. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

    WHY IT MATTERS: China

    WASHINGTON (AP) — THE ISSUE: Tensions have been rising between China and the United States. China is modernizing its military and pressing its sovereignty claims over the disputed South China Sea, an important route for global trade. The U.S. is pushing back by increasing its military presence in Asia, which China views as provocative. The U.S. also accuses China of unfair trading practices and cyber theft of business secrets. Tough action by either side could spark a skirmish at sea or a trade war that would make many goods in the U.S. more expensive.