• In this image made from video, Attaporn Boonmakchuay gestures while talking to reporters, while lying in a hospital bed following a snake attack at his home in Chachoengsao, 90km east of the capital Bangkok, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. Boonmakchuay is recovering from a bloody encounter with a 3-meter (10-foot) python that slithered through the plumbing of his home and latched its jaws onto his penis as he was using a squat toilet. (BBTV CH7 Thailand via AP) THAILAND OUT

    Thai man bloodied but unbowed after intimate attack by snake

    BANGKOK (AP) — A Thai man is recovering from a bloody encounter with a 3-meter (10-foot) python that slithered through the plumbing of his home and latched its jaws onto his penis as he was using a squat toilet.

  • In this Wednesday, May 18, 2016 photo, a Sri Lankan landslide survivor caries her dog as she walks on the mud after a landslide in Elangipitiya village in Aranayaka about 72 kilometers (45 miles) north east of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Soldiers and police used sticks and bare hands Wednesday to dig through enormous piles of mud covering houses in three villages hit by massive landslides in central Sri Lanka, with hundreds of families reported missing. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena, File)

    AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from the past week in Asia

    A landslide survivor carried her dog through mud in Sri Lanka, where heavy rains and flooding killed dozens of people and swamped thousands of homes in the capital.

  • In this May 29, 2014 file photo, Thai soldiers form a line while guarding a bus stop area to prevent an anti-coup demonstration at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand’s military seized power from an elected government on May 22, 2014, with the justification that it wanted to end chaotic and violent political confrontations that had wracked the country for years. But there was more than an attempt to restore stability at play. The coup really was traditional ruling elite’s latest and most decisive intervention in what is now a decade-long war for political power with billionaire telecommunications tycoon-turned-politician Thaksin Shinawatra. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn, File)

    AP Analysis: Why junta rules Thailand, with no end in sight

    BANGKOK (AP) — Thailand’s military seized power from an elected government on May 22, 2014, with the justification that it wanted to end chaotic and violent political confrontations that had wracked the country for years. But more than an attempt to restore stability was at play.

  • FILE- In this May 29, 2014, file photo, Thai soldiers guard an area to prevent an anti-coup demonstration at Victory Monument in Bangkok, Thailand. In the early evening of May 22, 2014, all TV screens in Thailand turned blue and up flashed an army emblem. That was the first sign of change. Suddenly, the country's army commander appeared on-screen to say that he was now in charge. Without firing a shot or spilling any blood, the military had staged its second coup in eight years _ and its 12th since the end of absolute monarchy in 1932. (AP Photo/Wason Wanichakorn, File)

    Voices from Thailand: Reflections on 2-year coup anniversary

    BANGKOK (AP) — In the early evening of May 22, 2014, all TV screens in Thailand turned blue and up flashed an army emblem. That was the first sign of change. Suddenly, the country’s army commander appeared to say he was now in charge.