• In this Tuesday, May 24, 2016 photo, Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors head coach Choi Kang-hee, right, speaks about a bribery scandal involving one of the club's scouts during a press conference at World Cup Stadium in Jeonju, South Korea. An official from K-League said Wednesday, May 25 that two former soccer referees, who allegedly received 5 million won ($4,200) from a Jeonbuk Hyundai Motors scout over five matches between March and October 2013, were permanently expelled from the league in December after the investigation began. (Choi Young-soo/Yonhap via AP) KOREA OUT

    Ex-South Korean soccer referees indicted over payments

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — South Korean prosecutors have indicted two former soccer referees over allegations that they received money from a club official — also formally charged — in return for favorable decisions in five K-League matches in 2013.

  • JOC sets up 3-man team to investigate Tokyo 2020 payments

    TOKYO (AP) — The Japanese Olympic Committee has set up an investigative team to see if there were any illegal payments made to a Singapore firm which have entangled Tokyo’s winning 2020 Olympic bid in a bribery investigation.

  • In this undated and unknown location photo, the new leader of Taliban fighters, Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada poses for a portrait. The Afghan Taliban confirmed on Wednesday that their leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour was killed in a U.S. drone strike last week and that they have appointed a successor - a scholar known for extremist views who is unlikely to back a peace process with Kabul. (Afghan Islamic Press via AP)

    Afghan Taliban appoint new leader after Mansour’s death

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The Afghan Taliban confirmed on Wednesday that their leader Mullah Akhtar Mansour was killed in a U.S. drone strike last week and that they have appointed a successor — a scholar known for extremist views who is unlikely to back a peace process with Kabul.

  • Gunmen kill 3 paramilitary forces in northwest Pakistan

    PESHAWAR, Pakistan (AP) — A senior police officer says gunmen riding on motorcycles have ambushed a vehicle carrying paramilitary forces in northwest Pakistan, killing three of them before fleeing.

  • In this May 11, 2016 photo, Terumi Tanaka, secretary general of Japan Confederation of A-and H-bomb Sufferers Organizations, speaks during an exclusive interview with The Associated Press in Tokyo. The debate over whether U.S. President Barack Obama should apologize to Japanese survivors of America’s atomic bombings in World War II made Tanaka think: What about his own government? Tanaka was 13 when the U.S. dropped its second atomic bomb on Nagasaki city on Aug. 9, 1945, three days after the first on Hiroshima.(AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko)

    VOICES: A-bomb survivors leader says Japan shares blame, too

    TOKYO (AP) — The debate over whether President Barack Obama should apologize to Japanese survivors of America’s atomic bombings in World War II made Terumi Tanaka think: What about his own government?

  • President Barack Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands after speaking to media in Shima, Japan, Wednesday, May 25, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

    Obama to wrap up trip to Vietnam by talking to young leaders

    SHIMA, Japan (AP) — Laying bare the complex politics of reconciliation and contrition, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe on Wednesday rejected the idea of visiting Pearl Harbor to reciprocate for President Barack Obama’s historic trip to Hiroshima later this week. Obama, for his part, said he would use his time in Hiroshima to honor all those killed in World War II and to push for a world without nuclear weapons.

  • In this Jan. 18, 2016 file photo, Wang Jianlin, chairman of Wanda Group, delivers a speech at the Ninth Asian Financial Forum in Hong Kong. Wanda Group and its billionaire founder, Wang Jianlin, are inaugurating a sprawling entertainment complex Saturday, May 28 in China's southeast three weeks before the June 16 opening of Disney's first mainland Chinese park in Shanghai. (AP Photo/Vincent Yu, File)

    China’s Wanda prepares for battle with ‘old brand’ Disney

    BEIJING (AP) — Mickey Mouse has a new and deep-pocketed challenger: China’s shopping mall king.

  • In this May 24, 2016 file photo, a man puts a banner of the G7 Summit at International Media Center in Ise, Mie Prefecture, central Japan. Leaders of the Group of Seven rich nations will undoubtedly voice unity over fighting terrorism, pandemics and tax evasion at their summit in Japan starting on Thursday, May 26. Finding a consensus on how to breathe life into their sluggish economies is proving more elusive. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)

    Group of 7 seeks way forward for aging, faltering economies

    ISE, Japan (AP) — Leaders of the Group of Seven rich nations plan to voice unity over fighting terrorism, pandemics and tax evasion at their summit in Japan this week. Finding a consensus on how to breathe life into their sluggish economies is proving more elusive.

  • Pakistan's Interior Minister, Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan addresses a news conference in Islamabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Khan said authorities will perform DNA tests on the body of a man who was killed in an American drone strike to determine whether the slain man is actually Taliban chief Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour. Khan also condemned the drone strike, calling it a violation of Pakistan's sovereignty. (AP Photo/B.K. Bangash)

    Pakistan: DNA tests to confirm Taliban leaders death

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan’s Interior Minister Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan said Tuesday that authorities will perform DNA tests on the body of a man who was killed in an American drone strike to determine whether the slain man is actually Taliban chief Mullah Mohammed Akhtar Mansour.

  • Trader Gregory Rowe, center, works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Tuesday, May 24, 2016. Stocks are opening solidly higher on Wall Street, led by gains in technology stocks and banks. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

    US stocks jump as rising interest rates help banks higher

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — Asian stock markets rallied Wednesday as solid U.S. housing sales data and overnight gains on Wall Street raised expectations for a strong recovery in the world’s largest economy.