• Endangered bat, cacti subjects of new federal lawsuit

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Agricultural groups in New Mexico and Texas want two cacti and a rare bat thrown off the federal endangered species list.

    Updated: 6:10 am

  • San Antonio Spurs' Tony Parker (9) is pressured by Phoenix Suns defenders Jon Leuer (30) and Mirza Teletovic (35) during the second half of an NBA basketball game, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015, in San Antonio. San Antonio won 98-84. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Spurs’ Parker names cubs at Texas zoo for self, wife, son

    SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Spurs star Tony Parker had a walk on the wild side this week and has named three African lion cubs at the San Antonio Zoo after his wife, their son and himself.

  • In this Saturday, Nov. 21, 2015 photo, Cuban migrants line up for breakfast given to them by an evangelical church, outside of the border control building in Penas Blancas, Costa Rica, on the border with Nicaragua. Thousands of Cuban migrants have been able to make the trip to the U.S. thanks to a constant flow of information between migrants starting the journey and those who have just completed it. (AP Photo/Esteban Felix)

    Social media helps drive historic Cuban exodus to US

    PENAS BLANCAS, Costa Rica (AP) — As summer began to bake the central Cuban city of Sancti Spiritus, Elio Alvarez and Lideisy Hernandez sold their tiny apartment and everything in it for $5,000 and joined the largest migration from their homeland in decades.

  • In this Friday, Nov. 20, 2015 file photo, an elderly man tosses fallen gingko leaves into the air in a park in Beijing. China's capital has been hit with unusually cool and wet weather in recent weeks. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein, File)

    AP PHOTOS: Editor selections from Asia

    In images from across Asia last week, Nepalis lit candles for the victims of Paris attacks, U.S. President Barack Obama visited Asia to meet with regional leaders and a darling panda cub made her public debut at a Malaysian zoo.

  • In this July 31, 2015 file photo, two rattlesnakes hide in a crack in a rock at an undisclosed location in western Rutland County, Vt. Jeffrey Lorch, a microbiologist with the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, Wisc., said in a paper published Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2015, that he has identified the fungus that has been infecting some snake species in the eastern United States. Vermont's small population of rattlesnakes is being threatened by the fungus that was first observed by scientists a few years earlier. (AP Photo/Wilson Ring, File)

    Scientists: Fungus causes snake ailment, but reason elusive

    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — A fungus has been identified as the cause of a mysterious ailment that has been infecting some snake species in the eastern United States, threatening some isolated snake populations such as the timber rattlesnakes found in western Vermont.

  • Navajo Nation investigating poaching of 8 raptors

    TOHATCHI, N.M. (AP) — Navajo Nation officials are investigating the deaths of eight predatory birds that were shot and dumped on the outskirts of Tohatchi (toe-HATCH’-ee).

  • New Mexico Game Commission delays decision on wolf permit

    ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) — The State Game Commission has decided to delay a decision on an appeal that would allow endangered Mexican gray wolves to be kept at Ted Turner’s ranch in southern New Mexico.