• Baylor receiver Zamora suspended 3 games for beating dog

    WACO, Texas (AP) — Baylor sophomore receiver Ishmael Zamora has been suspended for the first three games of the season after a video surfaced of him beating his dog with a belt this summer.

  • In this undated photo provided by the MR Research Center some trained dogs involved in a study to investigate how dog brains process speech sit around a scanner in Budapest, Hungary. Scientists have found that dogs use the same brain areas as humans to process language. A study published in the journal Science showed that dogs process words with the left hemisphere and use the right hemisphere to process intonation. (Borbala Ferenczy/MR Research Center via AP)

    Good boy! Dogs know what you’re saying, study suggests

    BERLIN (AP) — Scientists have found evidence to support what many dog owners have long believed: man’s best friend really does understand some of what we’re saying.

  • Recreational red snapper season to closes Sept. 5

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana’s recreational red snapper season will close Sept. 5.

  • In this image made available by the Norwegian  Environment Agency on Monday Aug. 29  2016,  shows some of the more than 300 wild reindeer that  were killed by lighting in Hardangervidda, central Norway on Friday Aug. 26, 2016  in what wildlife officials say was a highly unusual massacre by nature. (Havard Kjotvedt /Norwegian  Environment Agency, NTB scanpix, via AP)

    Lightning strike kills more than 300 reindeer in Norway

    STOCKHOLM (AP) — More than 300 wild reindeer have been killed by lightning in central Norway.

  • In this Aug. 3, 2016 photo, a large bison blocks traffic in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone National Park as tourists take photos of the animal. Record visitor numbers at the nation's first national park have transformed its annual summer rush into a sometimes dangerous frenzy, with selfie-taking tourists routinely breaking park rules and getting too close to Yellowstone's storied elk herds, grizzly bears, wolves and bison.  (AP Photo/Matthew Brown)

    Visitor misbehavior abounds as US parks agency turns 100

    YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Tourist John Gleason crept through the grass, four small children close behind, inching toward a bull elk with antlers like small trees at the edge of a meadow in Yellowstone National Park.

  • Mussels disappearing from New England waters, scientists say

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — New England is running out of mussels.

  • Commercial crabber Mal Luebkert holds a block of Organobait synthetic bait on his boat on the Great Wicomico river in Heathsville, Va., Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. Fisheries for lobsters and crabs have grappling with a shortage of bait that synthetic bait may help with. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

    Goodbye, herring? Biotech bait gives lobstermen alternative

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Lobster and crab fishermen have baited traps with dead herring for generations, but an effort to find a synthetic substitute for forage fish is nearing fruition just as the little fish are in short supply, threatening livelihoods in a lucrative industry.

  • Woman jostled on NYC subway loses grip on crickets and worms

    NEW YORK (AP) — New York City subway riders are likely to get bugged over a lot of things — but a recent incident was one for the books.

  • In this Tuesday, Aug. 23, 2016 photo, Matthew Pearson, left, of Bellingham, Wash., views a traveling totem pole with his son Graham, in Bellingham. A Pacific Northwest tribe has begun a nearly 5,000 mile road trip with a 22-foot-tall totem pole in tow. The Lummi Nation embarked on its fourth “totem journey” since 2012 to galvanize opposition to coal and crude oil projects it says could imperil native lands. (Robert Mittendorf/The Bellingham Herald via AP)

    Tribe trucks totem pole 4,800 miles in fossil fuels protest

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — A Pacific Northwest tribe is traveling nearly 5,000 miles across Canada and the United States with a 22-foot-tall totem pole on a flatbed truck in a symbolic journey meant to galvanize opposition to fossil fuel infrastructure projects they believe will imperil native lands.

  • FILE--In this Nov. 1, 2013, file photo, a car stops to allow a moose to cross Westpark Drive in Anchorage, Alaska. Moose killed by cars and truck along the Alaska road system are salvaged and donated to people on the Alaska State Troopers' "charity list" but the Alaska Moose Federation says all or parts of three moose killed recently have been stolen before they could be picked up and delivered for processing. (AP Photo/Dan Joling, file)

    Alaska roadkill thieves target moose meant for charity

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Thieves coming across dead moose on Alaska roads are stealing the carcasses, making away with hundreds of pounds of meat that normally goes to a program run by state troopers that gives it to the needy and others willing to butcher the carcasses, officials said Wednesday.