• In this Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015 file photo the likeness of a whale adorns a door at the New Bedford Whaling Museum in New Bedford, Mass. The museum has compiled a digital archive of more than a hundred thousand names of men who embarked on whaling voyages out of the Massachusetts port before the final one in 1927. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File)

    Did your ancestor hunt whales? Museum database offers clues

    BOSTON (AP) — A digital list of the tens of thousands of men who embarked on whaling voyages out of New Bedford, from 10-year-old boys to a 70-year-old sailor who drank himself to death in South Africa, is a valuable resource for anyone researching their family’s seafaring past. Just be warned: You might not like what you find.

  • In this July 18, 2016 photo, Sri Lankan mangrove conservation workers carry mangrove saplings for planting in Kalpitiya, about 130 kilometers (81 miles) north of Colombo, Sri Lanka. Sri Lanka's government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests _ the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, better absorb carbon from the environment mitigating effects of global warming and reducing impact of natural disasters like tsunamis. Authorities have identified about 37,000 acres (15,000 hectares) of mangrove forests in Sri Lanka that are earmarked for preservation. (AP Photo/Eranga Jayawardena)

    Sri Lanka to conserve climate-friendly mangroves ecosystem

    PAMBALA LAGOON, Sri Lanka (AP) — Sri Lanka’s government and environmentalists are working to protect tens of thousands of acres of mangrove forests — the seawater-tolerant trees that help protect and build landmasses, absorb carbon from the environment and reduce the impact of natural disasters like tsunamis.

  • In this Saturday, July 16, 2016 photo, Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem pulls weeds on a tomato farm in Ramtha, Jordan. He's among thousands of displaced Syrians who recently obtained work permits as part of Jordan's promise to the international community to put 50,000 refugees to work legally by the end of the year in exchange for interest-free loans and easier access to European markets. So far, some 23,000 Syrians have been given work permits in the kingdom under the deal, aimed in part at keeping refugees in the region with a promise of jobs and education for their children, and deterring them from moving on to Europe. (AP Photo/Raad Adayleh)

    Jordan deal with donors means legal work for Syria refugees

    RAMTHA, Jordan (AP) — Syrian refugee Fawaz al-Jasem used to drop his tools and run when he saw police approaching the farm in northern Jordan where he has been picking vegetables for the past three years.

  • Bee advocates, pecan growers battle over pesticide request

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — A plea from New Mexico’s pecan growers to use a restricted pesticide against insect infestations is drawing opposition from advocates for the honey bee.

  • Unbeaten Enola Gray romps to 7 3/4-length win at Del Mar

    DEL MAR, Calif. (AP) — Unbeaten Enola Gray romped to a 7 3/4-length victory Friday in the $150,000 Fleet Treat Stakes for California-bred 3-year-old fillies.