• In this Wednesday, July 13, 2016 file photo, members of the New York Liberty basketball team await the start of a game against the Atlanta Dream in New York. The WNBA is withdrawing its fines for teams and players that showed support of citizens and police involved in recent shootings by wearing black warmup shirts before and during games. WNBA President Lisa Borders said in a statement Saturday, July 23, the league was rescinding penalties given to the Indiana Fever, New York Liberty, Phoenix Mercury and their players for wearing the shirts–which was a uniform violation. The players started wearing them to show solidarity after shootings in Minnesota and Baton Rouge, La. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

    WNBA president on rescinded fines: We needed to move forward

    NEW YORK (AP) — WNBA President Lisa Borders says she hopes that rescinding the fines the league imposed over black warmup shirts worn in solidarity for shooting victims will lead to a fresh start on social activism for the players and their union.

  • In this Saturday, July 16, 2016 photo, brothers Montrell White, 22, left, and Edwin White, 18, visit their childhood neighborhood for a potluck organized by young civil rights activists in the Estell Village subsidized apartment complex in the Highland Hills area of Dallas. The Whites say the neighborhood has been overrun with drugs and guns since they were kids. A rag tag group of young activists in this city have tried to raise awareness about the geographical segregation and unequal access to opportunities that continue to dog this city of 1.3 million people. (AP Photo/ Emily Schmall)

    In Dallas, burgeoning movement overshadowed by shooting

    DALLAS (AP) — The leadership of the Next Generation Action Network drove all night from Baton Rouge, Louisiana, arriving in Dallas early on July 7, just hours before the start of their hastily arranged march that ended in the worst attack on law enforcement since 9/11.

  • In this Nov. 25, 2014 file photo, people watch as stores burn in Ferguson, Mo. The four Republican candidates in Missouri's gubernatorial primary on Aug. 2, 2016, are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach, two years after the fatal Ferguson police shooting of Michael Brown prompted widespread protests. But the four candidates aren't focusing on complaints about police discrimination. Instead, their TV ads have shown images of riots while promising to "secure our streets" and "enforce the law." (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

    2 years after Ferguson, recriminations roil governor’s race

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — It has been two years since a white police officer fatally shot black teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri, touching off days of rioting, but the political repercussions from the incident have only intensified, fanned by a governor’s race in which all four Republican candidates are pledging an aggressive law-and-order approach.

  • In this June 25, 2016 photo, civil rights pioneer James Meredith, center, and others walk through downtown Jackson, Miss., to the state Capitol, as part of a 50th commemoration of his march from Memphis to Jackson to encourage black people to overcome a fear of violence and to encourage them to register to vote. Along the way, he was shot and wounded, causing several groups and hundreds of marchers, including the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., to take up the cause and help him finish the march to the Capitol. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

    Civil-rights marchers: US still needs to address inequality

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A half-century ago, thousands joined a march across Mississippi to challenge a system that condoned violence against black people and suppressed their rights — issues still reverberating in today’s national debates about police violence.

  • FILE- In this June 9, 2016 file photo, Arthur B. Johnson Jr., of Baltimore, demonstrates alone outside Baltimore's Courthouse East on the first day of the trial of Officer Caesar Goodson, one of six Baltimore city police officers charged in connection to the death of Freddie Gray, in Baltimore. More than a year after Freddie Gray's death, the same streets that exploded in fury and flame are calm. Despite back-to-back acquittals for officers charged in Gray's death, the physical protest movement that helped topple the careers of both the police commissioner and the mayor has dissipated, leaving activists exploring other avenues for change. (AP Photo/Steve Ruark, File)

    Weary of protest, Baltimore activists seek change elsewhere

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Under the beating summer sun, retired steelworker Arthur B. Johnson Jr. stood outside the Clarence Mitchell Courthouse in Baltimore, clutching the fraying wooden handle of a homemade sign.

  • In this Friday, July 22, 2016 photo, Collin Allen, the creator of 'White Men for Black Lives', poses on the Freedom Trail in Boston Common, as a group of summer camp children walk past, in Boston, Mass. Some white Americans say they're being spurred to action by the shootings of black men by officers in Minnesota and Louisiana after long sitting in silence. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

    How sympathetic whites are helping to fuel racial change

    MEDFORD, Mass. (AP) — In a story July 23 about white sympathy for black civil rights issues, The Associated Press erroneously reported the involvement of Ohio mother Lisa Vahey. She is seeking changes at her daughter’s high school, not her son’s.

  • Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump smiles as he addresses delegates during the final day session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Thursday, July 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

    Critics: Trump speech signals shift to coded race language

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — During the primaries, Donald Trump threw red-meat rhetoric to supporters, pledging to build a wall on the Mexico border and to ban Muslim immigrants. He even told at least one crowd that he wanted to punch a demonstrator who disrupted an event.

  • In this July 19, 2016 photo, Breaion King is overcome with emotion as she describes being pulled from her car and thrown to the ground by an Austin police officer during a traffic stop in 2015, during an interview at her attorney, Erica Grigg's office in Austin, Texas. Patrol car video publicly released Thursday, July 21, 2016, shows a white Austin, Texas, police officer violently throwing King to the ground during a traffic stop, followed by another white officer telling her black people have "violent tendencies" and whites are justifiably afraid. (Rodolfo Gonzalez/Austin American-Statesman via AP)

    Black Texas woman seeks unity as white officers investigated

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — A black Texas teacher thrown to the ground by a white officer during a traffic stop, and then told by another white officer on the way to jail that blacks have “violent tendencies,” said Friday she is grateful the police chief has publicly apologized.

  • This screenshot from a new website, Innclusive.com, shows the company's homepage. The founders of Innclusive.com started the vacation rentals website because of concerns about racism in the vacation rental industry, including travelers who said they'd experienced racism from Airbnb hosts. The founders have heard from many travelers and hosts who want to be involved with a vacation rental site that is committed to inclusivity. (Innclusive.com via AP)

    Racism at Airbnb inspires new sites Innclusive and Noirbnb

    NEW YORK (AP) — Accusations that Airbnb has been ignoring complaints of racism have led several black entrepreneurs to create two new vacation rental websites where they say racism will not be tolerated.

  • Kip Holden, the Democratic mayor of Baton Rouge, talks with elections officials after signing up to run for Congress, on Wednesday, July 20, 2016, in Baton Rouge, La. Many of the major candidates for U.S. Senate are expected to be among the first in line Wednesday morning at the Secretary of State's Office to qualify for their race. (AP Photo/Melinda Deslatte)

    Absent during protests, Baton Rouge mayor is more visible

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — After police killed a man outside a convenience store and protesters filled the streets, the first black mayor of the Louisiana capital seemed to be conspicuously missing. Kip Holden’s absence was so glaring that demonstrators called for his resignation.